World

10:01pm

Mon February 20, 2012
Asia

Protests, Self-Immolation Signs Of A Desperate Tibet

Originally published on Tue February 21, 2012 6:44 pm

freetibet.org, shows a man being forcibly detained by security forces in the town of Serther in Tibet following a clash with protesters and police." href="/post/protests-self-immolation-signs-desperate-tibet" class="noexit lightbox">
This photo, provided to freetibet.org, shows a man being forcibly detained by security forces in the town of Serther in Tibet following a clash with protesters and police.
freetibet.org

In a monastery on the Tibetan plateau, monks swathed in crimson robes chant under silk hangings, in a murky hall heavy with the smell of yak butter. Photos of the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama — seen by China as a splittist — are openly displayed, as if in defiance. But Chinese security forces have tightened their grasp on this region, and monasteries appear to be emptying out, gripped by an atmosphere of fear and loss.

Read more
Tags: 

12:58pm

Mon February 20, 2012
Europe

Portugal Plays By The Rules, But Economy Slumps

Originally published on Tue February 21, 2012 9:25 am

A once-bustling vegetable market in Lisbon is now beyond the reach of many Portuguese — a sign of their country's economic problems.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

The eurozone crisis has focused attention on debt-burdened Greece spiraling into decline. Meanwhile, Portugal is seen as the international creditors' poster-child for obediently slashing spending and welfare benefits.

Nevertheless, the Portuguese national debt continues to grow, and the country is mired in recession and soaring unemployment.

The Portuguese national character has long been identified with Fado music. Raquel Freire, an activist with the local Occupy movement, says the melancholy style helps explain decades of resignation.

Read more

5:34am

Mon February 20, 2012
Asia

S. Korea Conducts Drill, Flouting N. Korean Threat

South Korean Navy ships dock at a floating base near Yeonpyong Island, close to its contested ocean border with North Korea Monday. South Korea conducted live-fire military drills from five islands, ignoring Pyongyang's threat to attack.
Bae Jung-hyun AP

South Korea conducted live-fire military drills near its disputed sea boundary with North Korea Monday, despite Pyongyang's threat to respond with a "merciless" attack.

North Korea did not carry out the threat as it focuses on internal stability two months after the death of longtime leader Kim Jong Il and prepares for nuclear disarmament talks with the United States later this week. But with American forces scheduled to conduct additional military exercises with ally South Korea over the next few months, tensions are expected to remain high in the region.

Read more

2:00am

Mon February 20, 2012
Africa

Wade's Re-Election Bid Rocks Senegal's Stability

Originally published on Mon February 20, 2012 5:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Senegal, on the coast of West Africa, has been something of a model of stability for a region known for its volatility. But this past week has brought protests and violence to Senegal after demonstrations over a presidential election this coming weekend led to clashes with riot police. We've got NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on the line from the capital Dakar to tell us what is going on there.

Good morning, Ofeibea.

Read more
Tags: 

10:01pm

Sun February 19, 2012
Europe

Signs Of A Media Crackdown Emerge In Russia

Originally published on Mon February 20, 2012 4:56 am

Alexei Venediktov, then editor-in-chief of Moscow Echo radio station, talks with Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin during an awards ceremony in Moscow, Jan. 13. Venediktov's ouster this month is seen as a sign that the Russian government may be cracking down on the independent media.
Yana Lapikova AFP/Getty Images

With less than two weeks to go before Russia's presidential elections, the country's independent journalists are in a state of anxiety. Government-run media seem more open than ever to divergent viewpoints — but officials may be cracking down on independent outlets that go too far.

Two incidents last week suggest that the Russian government is prepared to lean on journalists — both domestic and foreign.

Read more
Tags: 

Pages