World

2:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Europe

Strauss-Kahn Speaks Publicly For The First Time Since Arrest

The former head of the International Monetary Fund has given his first television interview since returning to France after being arrested in May on accusations he sexually assaulted a hotel maid in New York. The charges were dropped but Dominique Strauss Kahn still faces a lawsuit brought by the maid. A French writer also claims he tried to rape her. Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

10:55am

Wed September 7, 2011
Latin America

Brazil Hopes To Add Oil Wealth To A Booming Economy

Brazil's energy company, Petrobras, inaugurated a new offshore platform on June 3 in Angra dos Reis. Brazil has located major offshore oil fields and plans to greatly increase production in the coming years.
Ari Versiani AFP/Getty Images

When people say Brazil won't be the next Saudi Arabia, they mean it in a good way.

Brazil has discovered enormous oil reserves far off its coast, but the country's robust and varied economy means it shouldn't become dependent on oil.

"Brazil is not just going to be an oil exporting country," says Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars. "That's not all it's going to do."

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10:01pm

Tue September 6, 2011
Interviews

Baghdad College And America's Shifting Role In Iraq

Originally published on Wed September 7, 2011 1:57 pm

Students play a basketball game on the campus of Iraq's Baghdad College, in this undated photograph.
Ed Ou The New York Times

A school founded by Americans in Iraq before the Saddam Hussein era is an emblem of a time when the United States was known in the Middle East not for military action, but for culture and education. That's the view of Puliter Prize-winning New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid, who recently wrote an essay about the school, titled "The American Age, Iraq."

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2:52pm

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Artist, Social Critic Ai Weiwei Breaks Silence, Attacks Chinese Government

Ai Weiwei in October 2009.
Miguel Villagran Getty Images

The dissident artist Ai Weiwei has struggled with the Chinese government for years. Earlier this year, the conflict came to a head, when Ai was detained by the government for about 80 days. He was let go under the condition that he would not talk to the press.

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2:57pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Africa

A New Obstacle To Normal Relations For Sudan, U.S.

Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir speaks of the capital Khartoum on July 12. Sudan says it should be taken off the U.S. terrorism list, but Washington says it is concerned about new fighting in the south of the country.
Ashraf Shazly AFP/Getty Images

When Sudan allowed South Sudan to become an independent nation last month, it hoped this would put an end to years of friction with the United States.

More specifically, Sudan desperately wanted to be removed from Washington's list of state sponsors of terrorism and get out from under the many sanctions that come along with that designation.

But now the U.S. and the United Nations are raising concerns about fighting, and possible atrocities, near the border between Sudan and South Sudan.

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