World

2:50pm

Fri September 12, 2014
Middle East

Israel Says It Is Investigating Dozens Of Gaza Shootings

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:13 am

Mai Hamada, 30, was injured by an Israeli airstrike on a home for the disabled in July in the Gaza Strip. Hamada has cerebral palsy and can't walk. Israel is investigating cases of possible illegal action by its military and may look into the attack on the group home.
Emily Harris/NPR

The Israeli military says that it has investigated more than 40 potentially illegal actions by its forces during the war in the Gaza Strip this summer and announced this week that it has opened criminal investigations into five cases.

In Gaza, Jamila Eleywa, the director of a home for disabled people that was hit in July, killing two residents, hopes she'll learn why her building was hit.

"Why?" she said at Gaza City's al-Shifa Hospital, where the injured residents were taken. "Why they did that?"

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2:40pm

Fri September 12, 2014
Parallels

Islamic State Rule: Municipal Services And Public Beheadings

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 7:25 pm

This image, posted on a militant website, shows an Islamic State fighter waving a flag from a captured government fighter jet in Raqqa, Syria. The Islamic State captured the city in northeastern Syria last year and it has effectively served as its capital.
Uncredited AP

In just a year, the self-proclaimed Islamic State has set up an efficient government in Raqqa, a provincial capital in Syria's northeast, part of the farm belt a few hours drive from the Turkish border.

Officials from the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, provide services and have taken control of schools and impose taxes. The group has staffed a police force and even directs traffic.

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2:21pm

Fri September 12, 2014
Parallels

Riding The 'Silver Dragon,' Surfers Tame China's 10-Foot River Waves

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 9:01 pm

A team from Honolulu, which included Jamie O'Brien of Hawaii's North Shore, won this week's surfing competition, held on one of the world's two biggest tidal bores, located in Hangzhou, China. The other is in the Amazon.
Courtesy of Wabsono

The hottest surfing in China this week wasn't along some palm-fringed beach in the south, but on a muddy, sometimes trash-strewn river in the eastern city of Hangzhou.

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2:21pm

Fri September 12, 2014
Parallels

Mexican Crackdown Slows Central American Immigration To U.S.

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 4:32 pm

Migrants at a shelter in southern Mexico say that Mexico's interior checkpoints are making it harder to travel north. Some have given up on reaching the U.S. and are trying to stay in Mexico.
Carrie Kahn NPR

The number of Central Americans reaching the U.S. border has dropped dramatically. According to the U.S. Border Patrol, 60 percent fewer unaccompanied minors were apprehended in August than at the height of the migration crisis earlier this summer.

One factor leading to the drastic decline is an unprecedented crackdown in Mexico. Under pressure from the United States, Mexico has begun arresting and deporting tens of thousands of Central Americans long before they reach the U.S. border.

Stepped-Up Deportations

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9:16am

Fri September 12, 2014
Parallels

Life In Eastern Ukraine Returns To Something Like Normalcy

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 11:05 am

People wait for a bus in the empty streets of Donetsk on Tuesday. The city's population, which was 900,000, is now down to around 300,000. It is beginning to return to normal following a cease-fire, which was signed last week and is mostly holding. But residents are divided over the region's future.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Irina Vladimirovna's four small children skip down a broad sidewalk in downtown Donetsk, in eastern Ukraine, happy to be able to play outdoors again. The 33-year-old mother and kindergarten teacher strolls behind with her mother, Ludmila Timofeyvna. They've been living for weeks in an underground shelter to escape this summer's shelling between separatists and the Ukrainian government.

"We had nowhere else to escape to," Vladimirovna says.

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