World

3:07am

Tue September 2, 2014
Parallels

As The U.S. Draws Down, Afghan Fighting Is Heating Up

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:16 am

An Afghan policeman searches a man at a checkpoint where a NATO soldier was stabbed to death in Kabul on Aug. 20. As U.S. and NATO troops are drawing down in Afghanistan, the Taliban have been stepping up attacks this summer.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

As U.S. and NATO troops draw down in Afghanistan, Taliban fighters are growing bolder. They have been massing in larger and larger numbers and taking on Afghan forces across the country.

NPR producer Sultan Faizy and I spent a recent day making calls to ordinary Afghan citizens in some of the country's hot spots.

Read more

4:40am

Mon September 1, 2014
Parallels

Why Did Crowd Flee Shanghai Subway After Foreigner Fainted?

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:59 am

A still from the surveillance camera footage shows the fainting man (top left and bottom right) lying alone in a subway car, as the few remaining occupants hurry away.
YouTube

One Saturday night this summer, a foreigner fainted and fell to the floor of a Shanghai subway car.

The passengers around him scattered. Not a single person tried to help.

When the train arrived at the next station, hundreds rushed out, nearly trampling each other.

The incident was captured on closed-circuit cameras. Tens of millions in China have now seen the images, which have rekindled a long-running debate among Chinese about their national character as well as trust and fear in modern society.

Read more

10:46am

Sun August 31, 2014
Parallels

Gaza's Shattered Airport, Once A Symbol Of Sovereignty

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 5:23 pm

The destroyed and deserted main gate of the Gaza international airport in the southern city of Rafah.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

It's hard to imagine a more compelling monument to the rise and fall of the Palestinian dream of statehood than the bombed-out ruins that the 1.8 million people of Gaza call their international airport.

Read more

5:47am

Sat August 30, 2014
Parallels

The Wall That Defined Scotland's Frontier 2,000 Years Ago To Today

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 10:33 am

Hadrian's Wall marks the Roman Empire's northernmost boundary, and at one point is less than a mile from today's border between England and Scotland.
Ari Shapiro NPR

About 2,000 years ago, the Roman Empire stretched from the Middle East all the way across Western Europe. A wall marked the empire's northernmost boundary, at one point less than a mile from today's border between England and Scotland.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built the 73-mile wall at this point to keep the unruly Scottish out. When the Scottish vote in an independence referendum on Sept. 18, they will be deciding whether they want to separate from the rest of Britain.

Read more

2:07pm

Fri August 29, 2014
Parallels

With Homegrown Technology, Israel Becomes Leading Arms Exporter

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 6:40 pm

An Israeli soldier launches a drone that's attached to a military vehicle in southern Israel, not far from the border with the Gaza Strip, on July 29. Israel was a pioneer with drones and has developed a number of military technologies that it later sells abroad.
Jim Hollander EPA/Landov

One byproduct of the recurring battles between Israel and its Arab neighbors is that Israel has developed a homegrown weapons industry that addresses its very specific needs.

Over the decades, this has included a number of cutting-edge technologies, from drones to night-vision equipment, which have been widely exported.

A more recent example is the Iron Dome, which was used throughout the latest conflict with Hamas in the Gaza Strip. The mobile missile defense system is capable of stopping short-range rockets from places like Gaza, the West Bank and southern Lebanon.

Read more

Pages