Mohamed Hassan / Pixabay

Stuck In Low-Wage Jobs, Women In Fort Morgan Help Each Other Return To School

At a community center off Main Street in Fort Morgan, Colorado, 25-year-old Sitina sits near the window, fidgeting with her set of keys. Once this interview is over, she’ll race home to make dinner for her family: a husband and two young kids. She worries about whether she’ll make it to bed on time. Her Saturday shift at the Cargill meatpacking plant starts at 5 a.m.

Read More
Women's Foundation of Colorado

Today on Colorado Edition: we'll learn about one city that's considering creating its own municipal broadband network. Plus, what exactly is an AR-15? We'll also learn about how the city of Fort Collins is re-evaluating its crossing guards after a recent death. Finally, why a group of women in Fort Morgan is working together to go back to school. 

Travis / Flickr

There’s an effort in Colorado to add a new kind of weapon (actually, a very, very old one) to the list of what people are allowed to use to hunt big game. That weapon is a prehistoric spear-thrower called an “atlatl.”

You can think of an atlatl like a “Chuckit,” one of those ball-launchers people use to throw tennis balls to their dogs, but instead of a tennis ball there’s a spear, arrow or dart.

Mohamed Hassan / Pixabay

At a community center off Main Street in Fort Morgan, Colorado, 25-year-old Sitina sits near the window, fidgeting with her set of keys. Once this interview is over, she’ll race home to make dinner for her family: a husband and two young kids. She worries about whether she’ll make it to bed on time. Her Saturday shift at the Cargill meatpacking plant starts at 5 a.m.

When it comes to global health, the world has made remarkable strides over the past two decades. There has been unprecedented progress vaccinating kids, treating diseases and lifting millions out of poverty. The childhood death rate has been slashed in half since 2000. Adults are living an average 5 1/2 years longer.

As an increasing number of states focus on renewable energy, batteries are becoming more of a necessity. And according to a new report, battery costs are dropping—but not enough to compete with fossil fuels.

The report comes from Climate Central, a nonprofit organization that studies the impacts of climate change. In it, the authors state that batteries and renewable energy sources are becoming cheaper by the year.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

As climate change continues to sap the Colorado River’s water, some users face serious legal risks to their supplies, according to a new analysis by researchers in Colorado and New Mexico. 

Declining flows could force Southwest water managers to confront long-standing legal uncertainties, and threaten the water security of Upper Basin states of Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico.

In response to skyrocketing youth suicide rates, one rural Colorado county is now offering kids two free vouchers to see a counselor at a local mental health center. 

A recent study out of Brigham Young University suggests that e-bikes can give riders a workout nearly as strenuous as traditional bikes.

Colorado Department of Transportation

Today on Colorado Edition: Colorado lawmakers passed a high-capacity magazine ban following the Aurora theater shooting in 2012. Since then, few people have been sentenced for violating the ban. We explore the enforcement of the ban in our state, and explore how other states with similar laws are handling things. We also look at transportation funding, following the defeat of a handful of tax measures across our state that would have put money into infrastructure.

A new draft proposal by the Trump administration may throw both current and future clean air and water laws into question.

Pages

Loading...

Loading...

Colorado Edition

KUNC's Colorado Edition is a daily look at the stories, news, people and issues important to you. It's a window to the communities along the Colorado Rocky Mountains.