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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

An electronic version of the Mueller Report with redactions is seen on a cellphone outside the White House April 18, 2019, in Washington, DC.
An electronic version of the Mueller Report with redactions is seen on a cellphone outside the White House April 18, 2019, in Washington, DC.

On Thursday morning, the Department of Justice released a redacted copy of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report about Russian meddling in the 2016 election. The 448-page report covers a range of topics, from Russian interference in the election to potential obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump.

— AJ (@ajchavar) April 18, 2019

What have we learned? Here are some highlights from L.A. Times reporter Chris Megerian:

— Chris Megerian (@ChrisMegerian) April 18, 2019

— Chris Megerian (@ChrisMegerian) April 18, 2019

— Chris Megerian (@ChrisMegerian) April 18, 2019

— Chris Megerian (@ChrisMegerian) April 18, 2019

And here’s NPR’s ongoing analysis of the report.

This week marked the 20th anniversary of the mass shooting at Columbine High School that left 12 students and one teacher dead.

We looked at the legacy of Columbine during a special broadcast in collaboration with KUNC Public Media and Guns & America earlier this week. Reporter Leigh Paterson shared her work with us, which includes conversations with Columbine survivors, school administrators and activists.

“Some of the reporting I’ve done should leave people with some hope,” she told us. “In spite of these shootings, evidence shows that school is one of the safest places your child could be.”

We’re also following the latest on the threat that led over a hundred schools in Colorado to cancel classes Wednesday. Florida teenager Sol Pais, whom authorities said was “infatuated” with the Columbine shooting, was found dead after a wide-scale manhunt.

Plus, we’ll bring you an update on the Trump administration’s immigration policy at the border. The Department of Justice will begin denying bond hearings to a large class of asylum seekers hoping to be released — a move that could affect tens of thousands of migrants. The decision, made by Attorney General William Barr, overrules a 2005 court ruling that guarantees bond hearings for certain migrants.

And what to make of President Trump’s proposal to send detained immigrants to sanctuary cities?

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 14, 2019

We’ll wrap up the week’s domestic news.

Text by Kathryn Fink.

GUESTS

Fernando Pizarro, Washington correspondent, Univision; @FPizarro_DC

Lisa Desjardins, Correspondent, PBS NewsHour; @LisaDNews

Shane Harris, Intelligence and national security reporter, The Washington Post; Future of War fellow, New America; author, ‘At War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex’ and ‘The Watchers: The Rise of America’s Surveillance State’; @shaneharris

For more, visit https://the1a.org.

© 2019 WAMU 88.5 – American University Radio.

Copyright 2020 WAMU 88.5. To see more, visit WAMU 88.5.