kunc-header-1440x90.png
Our Story Happens Here
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Coronavirus: When Staying Home Is Unsafe

A picture taken in Chatillon, south of Paris shows a view on the garden at the centre d'hebergement et de reinsertion sociale (CHRS), a shelter dedicated to women victims of domestic violence, run by SOS Femmes alternative NGO.
A picture taken in Chatillon, south of Paris shows a view on the garden at the centre d'hebergement et de reinsertion sociale (CHRS), a shelter dedicated to women victims of domestic violence, run by SOS Femmes alternative NGO.

Before we dive into this important and difficult conversation, we’re taking a moment to hear from you about your experience with the COVID-19 pandemic. You can always reach out to us to tell us how you’re doing and what you’re thinking: find the ways to do that here.

About 90 percent of the United States has been ordered to stay at home for at least a few weeks. Health officials say it’s the safest place for us.

But for some, staying home is dangerous. Advocates for domestic violence survivors are  raising the alarm about how dangerous staying at home during the coronavirus pandemic can be for people in abusive relationships.

From The New York Times:

Early last week, as the novel coronavirus exploded from state to state, a woman called the National Domestic Violence Hotline in a crisis: Her partner had tried to strangle her and she needed medical help, but feared going to the hospital because of the virus. Another woman was being forced to choose between work and home. “He threatened to throw me out if I didn’t work from home,” she said. “He said if I started coughing, he was throwing me out in the street and that I could die alone in a hospital room.”

What can be done to help people who are living with abusive partners during the pandemic? And what should neighbors do if they suspect someone is being hurt?

National Domestic Violence Hotline

Trained advocates are available 24/7/365 to talk confidentially with anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship.

Call 1-800-799-7233 or click here: thehotline.org/

Copyright 2020 WAMU 88.5. To see more, visit WAMU 88.5.