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Could We Have A COVID-19 Vaccine In Four Months? Scientists At Oxford Say It’s Possible.

A staff member (R) draws a blood sample from a volunteer at the start of a clinical trial being set up in Cape Town, to see whether the a vaccine given to babies in the country to protect them against tuberculosis, helps limit the damage caused by COVID-19.
A staff member (R) draws a blood sample from a volunteer at the start of a clinical trial being set up in Cape Town, to see whether the a vaccine given to babies in the country to protect them against tuberculosis, helps limit the damage caused by COVID-19.

Vaccines usually take at least a year (if not five or 10 years) to make. 

But the race for a coronavirus vaccine is on — and one group of scientists is hoping to get it done in a matter of months. 

A team at the University of Oxford says they can have a million doses of a COVID-19 vaccine ready by September

If it works, it would be the fastest a vaccine has ever gone from development to distribution.

We ask a virologist how likely this timeline is and what it might mean for the United States if they succeed.

Copyright 2020 WAMU 88.5. To see more, visit WAMU 88.5.

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Paige Osburn