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Working Remotely In The Near (And Distant) Future

A lower school substitute teacher works from her home due to the Coronavirus outbreak in Arlington, Virginia.
A lower school substitute teacher works from her home due to the Coronavirus outbreak in Arlington, Virginia.

Is it “you’re on mute” or “you’re muted?” Or the more direct: “You have to unmute?”

Setting Zoom etiquette aside, when workers arrived home when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, some thought logging on from our living rooms would be temporary. It could last a few months at the most.

It’s looking like a few months might turn into forever.

We still don’t know when many of America’s white-collar employees will return to their workplaces as many companies embrace video calls and remote systems. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced that all employees whose positions didn’t physically necessitate them coming into the office would be allowed to work from home indefinitely.

But the rapid shift towards teleworking has come with its fair share of issues. First, the pieces of software and systems that companies rely on aren’t always reliable. And then there’s the issue of cybersecurity. And finally, what effect will workers spending all day inside, isolated from one’s coworkers, have on the American psyche?

How can businesses and workers build a sustainable system for telework?

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