Stacy Nick / KUNC

Artist Haley Hasler Uses Self-Portraits To Flip The Script On ‘Girl, Interrupted’

Fort Collins artist Haley Hasler didn’t set out to focus on self-portraits. “It really started as a practical decision, where I needed a model, and as a young art student I had an available body in myself and the mirror,” said Hasler while walking around her latest exhibit, “Haley Hasler,” at the Museum of Art Fort Collins. “My work might start with just a little idea, like I’m going to have the female character. I don’t think of it as me. I do think of it as just a female character.”

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Denver Zoo Facebook

The patriarch of the Denver Zoo’s giraffe herd has died. The zoo says it put Dikembe down Thursday.

For several years, zoo staff treated Dikembe for a host of health issues, and when he showed signs of declining health they decided to put him down.

Dikembe was 24 years old, and the zoo says that made him the oldest male giraffe in North America.

He fathered 17 offspring while at the Denver Zoo.

Dikembe will be remembered by zoo staff as a “gentle, charismatic and goofy” giraffe

Liam James Doyle / NPR

The Senate is taking a procedural vote on whether or not to move Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination forward. Watch the proceedings on the Senate floor live this morning.

Eleina Elachkar (CMPR)

I can’t think of another movie that has put me into such anxiety as Free Solo. Shots straight down to the valley floor from the top of El Capitan are terrifying, and the images of rock climber Alex Honnold holding onto a vertical rock face with just the tips of his fingers and toes erases the very idea of rational thought.

Original illustration: Elkanah Tisdale / Edited by Ashley Jefcoat/KUNC

On this week's Colorado Edition, the Terminator throws his not-insignificant weight behind measures to end partisan gerrymandering in Colorado, and how diversity is creating big city problems for small town communities.

More than two months since an Ebola outbreak was declared in an eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, health officials are still struggling to end it.

So far at least 130 people have been infected. Last week the World Health Organization declared that the risk has gone from "high" to "very high" that the disease will spread to other parts of the country and to neighboring countries.

Yet some key health officials remain optimistic that it won't actually come to that.

How is that possible?

For those who track the rise of extreme populist nationalism worldwide, this Sunday's election in Brazil represents an important test of how far to the right voters in Latin America's largest nation are prepared to turn.

Amid a race widely regarded as the country's most divisive general election in decades, attention is focused on Jair Bolsonaro, a veteran congressman and retired army captain from the far right.

Bolsonaro not only has led the polls throughout the campaign but has managed to expand his lead in the race's closing days.

John Torres Jr. grew up watching his father, John Torres Sr. moonlight as a lucha libre wrestler.

Lucha libre is a style of professional wrestling that originated in Mexico. And love for the sport strengthened the bond between father and son.

Torres Sr. died in 2011 from complications with sarcoidosis — an inflammatory disease that usually affects the lungs, skin, or lymph nodes — at the age of 43. Torres, now 30, recently visited StoryCorps with his dad's best friend and fellow wrestler, Abraham Guzman, 49, to remember him.

Block by block, the place you were born and raised, can determine how far you get ahead in life.

A new online tool shows that geography plays an outsized role in a child's destiny.

Called the Opportunity Atlas, it was developed by Harvard economist Raj Chetty and his colleagues. It's a map that uses tax and U.S. Census data to track people's incomes from one generation to the next.

Walk into the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. right now and you will find a painting that has been ripped to shreds.

Another one, nearby, hangs half-loose from its stretcher, rumpled. It's a portrait of Thomas Jefferson; behind it, you glimpse a seated black woman.

They are works by the artist Titus Kaphar. He takes familiar images and remakes them. Maybe he pulls a hidden figure to the front.

His work often confronts the history of slavery and racism in the United States.

This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.

Editor's note: The following story contains some frank discussion of suicide.

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