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'Stories From the Syrian Frontline:' NPR Reporter Shares Experiences From Arab Spring

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Steve Barrett
/
NPR

NPR Foreign Correspondent Deborah Amos is a familiar voice to KUNC listeners. Most recently she’s been reporting from Syria, with more than a dozen trips to that country during the current conflict.She’s back in the U.S. -- for now -- and over the next two days will be speaking with Colorado college students, sharing her insights and experiences from covering the Arab Spring.

Amos will give a lecture Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 5:00 p.m. in the Eaton Humanities Building at the University of Colorado in Boulder. She'll appear Thursday, Jan. 17 at the Colorado School of Mines Student Center, also at 5:00 p.m.

Both presentations are free and sponsored jointly by the Center for Media, Religion and Culture at CU Journalism & Mass Communication, and the Hennebach Program in the Humanities at the Colorado School of Mines. Find details here.

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