© 2024
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Good News, Bad News: Japanese Economy Surges, But Likely Will Slow

In a classic example of "on the one hand, on the other hand" economic analysis, the word that Japan's economy grew at a strong 4.1 percent annual rate in the first quarter is being followed by cautionary talk of slower growth for the world's third-largest economy in coming quarters.

"Japan's economic growth probably peaked in the first quarter and analysts forecast the pace of expansion will halve by year-end as the boost from earthquake reconstruction fades," Bloomberg News says.

"Prospects remained uncertain for the current quarter because of fears about the European economy and other factors that could crimp expansion," Bloomberg BusinessWeek adds.

Reuters writes that "the figures underlined expectations that growth would slow down during the rest of the year, partly as the impact of the rebuilding effort fades."

Japan's northeast coast was shaken by a massive earthquake, and then pummeled by a tsunami, on March 11, 2011.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.
Related Content
  • Memories of the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan have created a niche industry of "disaster-protection gear." Many Japanese are now fully stocked up on emergency equipment, food and water.
  • Under a plan announced overnight, about 9,000 Marines will go to Guam and other places in the Pacific. Around 10,000 will remain.
  • The 787 Dreamliner will make the first-ever, non-stop Boston-Tokyo flight Sunday. Boston hotels and restaurants are prepping for a jump in Japanese tourists. Another economic boost could come from Japanese corporations that may now put their North American headquarters in Massachusetts. From member station WBUR, Curt Nickisch reports on the city's "nonstop excitement."
  • Russia has one of the world's 10 biggest economies, but it isn't even among the top 30 U.S. trading partners. A new John Deere plant there shows the complications of that relationship. To avoid tariffs, tractors and combines are built in Iowa, then taken apart and shipped to Russia, where they're reassembled.