NPR News

This week an Illinois fish processor is sending 44,000 pounds of Asian carp back to Asia as food. A small startup in Pearl, Ill., the Big River Fish Company is just one group that sees Asian carp not as a voracious, invasive species, but as a business opportunity.

Asian carp can be huge -- up to 100 pounds -- and they have been feasting on native fish in the Mississippi and Illinois rivers for years. Originally introduced to the United States in the 1970s to eat algae, the carp now threaten the Great Lakes.

China resisted U.S. pressure to condemn North Korea on Wednesday, a day after Pyongyang shelled a South Korea-held island, killing four people and ratcheting tensions on the peninsula to new highs.

Late Wednesday, China issued its first official statement, which was notable for its failure to condemn or even criticize North Korea. Instead, a foreign ministry spokesman urged both Koreas to show calm and restraint, and to engage in talks.

I've almost made peace with the fact that we aren't hauling our kids down to my parents in Florida for Thanksgiving.

Actually, it's my sister Cecily I feel bad about. She's the one I don't keep in touch with enough. She's 39, and -- deep breath -- "developmentally disabled and legally blind." Those jargon-y words give only the barest outline of her experience of navigating the world. And my family's experience, too.

Another Thanksgiving brings another round of traditional foods that can be bland, soggy and, frankly, unappealing. But it's not too late to snap your holiday meal out of the doldrums with a few simple cooking makeovers.

The holiday is full of culinary hurdles, says Chris Kimball, host of America's Test Kitchen on PBS. But he assures that a few recipe redos can help solve perennial problems.

Unlike many men I know, I am not a compulsive clicker-type person when watching television.

However, this fall, on autumn Mondays, I haven't been able to help myself: I keep switching back between two shows, Monday Night Football and Dancing With the Stars –– or MNF and DWTS, as we aficionados know them.

Surely this is the alpha and omega, the ying and yang, the dark and light, the heaven and hell of programming.

The United Nations announced Tuesday that less than 4 percent of the estimated $168 million needed to combat the cholera outbreak in Haiti has been pledged.

Meanwhile, the official death toll continues to rise. Haitian officials say cholera has killed more than 1,300 people and more help is needed.

Cholera has now been detected in eight of Haiti's 10 provinces, and the Haitian Health Ministry has confirmed almost 57,000 cases since the outbreak began last month.

The good news is that Federal Reserve policymakers think the economy will keep growing through next year and into 2012.

The bad news is that they've lowered their growth forecasts for 2011 and think the nation's jobless rate will stay uncomfortably high.

As the Associated Press says, the central bankers are "more pessimistic."

Somebody paid a little more than $200,000 today for a computer that's basically "a very fancy calculator," Gizmodo reporter Brian Barrett told NPR's Mary Louise Kelly earlier today.

While in Clarksville interviewing Vergil and Mark Richardson for my story about how the two brothers were falsely accused in a Texas drug case, I asked them to take me on a tour of their small town.

One of the stops was the high school gym where Vergil had been a star basketball player, leading Clarksville High School to the state championship game twice. We drove to the street behind the school, where the back of the gym faced a row of modest homes.

A legal drama has been playing out for almost three years in the Texas town of Clarksville of Red River County.

During that time, two black brothers have seen their lives turned upside down, and a white judge was recused from the case after allegations of judicial bias and criticism for pushing a drug case that just about everyone urged him to drop.

Clarksville, Texas

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