Anthony Kuhn

Foreign Correspondent Anthony Kuhn is currently based in Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR’s first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he covers Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania.

Prior to Jakarta, Kuhn spent five years based in Beijing as a NPR foreign correspondent reporting on China and Northeast Asia. In that time Kuhn covered stories including the affect of China’s resurgence on rest of the world, diplomacy and the environment, the ancient cultural traditions that still exert a profound influence in today's China, and the people's quest for social justice in a period of rapid modernization and uneven development. His beat also included such diverse topics as popular theater in Japan and the New York Philharmonic’s 2008 musical diplomacy tour to Pyongyang, North Korea.

In 2004-2005, Kuhn was based in London for NPR. He covered stories ranging from the 2005 terrorist attacks on London's transport system to the wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. In the spring of 2005, he reported from Iraq on the formation of the post-election interim government.

Kuhn began contributing reports to NPR from China in 1996. During that time, he also worked as an accredited freelance reporter with the Los Angeles Times, and as Beijing correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review.

In what felt to him a previous incarnation, Kuhn once lived on Manhattan’s Lower East Side and walked down Broadway to work in Chinatown as a social worker. He majored in French literature at Washington University in St. Louis. He gravitated to China in the early 1980s, studying first at the Beijing Foreign Languages Institute and later at the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, Im Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And Im Linda Wertheimer. Steve Inskeep is on assignment in Cairo.

With the U.S. and other first-world economies deep in debt and growing sluggishly, most of the world's economic expansion is now coming from developing nations.

Investors, meanwhile, have been pouring money into emerging markets, pumping up their stock prices and currency exchange rates.

Nearly a decade and a half ago, a similar flood of money caused Asian economies to tank and governments to crumble. This time, governments in Southeast Asia may have learned lessons to avert an economic meltdown similar to what took place then.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

As NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports, the fight over Yunis's job is partly political and partly economic.

ANTHONY KUHN: But, asks University of Oregon anthropologist Lamia Karim, why is the government only bringing this up now?

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