Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET Friday

The tap water in a small Colorado town has been contaminated with THC, the mind-altering ingredient of marijuana, local authorities told residents on Wednesday. A well supplying the town with water showed signs of tampering, the sheriff's office said.

From the outside, it looked like any of the other mugs in the Auschwitz museum.

But on the inside, this one had a secret — faithfully kept for seven decades.

A false bottom concealed a gold necklace and a gold ring inlaid with stones.

The enameled mug was one of more than 12,000 pieces of kitchenware that Nazis stole from people sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp in occupied Poland.

The White House state dinner in honor of Canada's prime minister had an exclusive guest list: philanthropists, business leaders, political powerhouses, one public radio host, ambassadors, movie stars.

And then, right between The Honorable Patrick Leahy, U.S. Senator (Vermont) and The Honorable Jacob Lew, Secretary of the Treasury, there she was, along with her husband:

Sports Authority has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, looking to restructure its debt and close a number of stores to try to regain its financial foothold.

The sporting goods retailer is carrying a heavy debt load.

In its restructuring, Sports Authority plans to access nearly $600 million in debtor-in-possession financing and close or sell approximately 140 stores and two distribution centers. The company operates more than 460 locations.

The al-Qaida-linked militant group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the bombing of a Somalian commercial airliner earlier this month.

In a statement, the Somalia-based Islamist group said the attack was targeting Western and Turkish intelligence agents and that the bomb was intended to destroy the entire plane, The Associated Press reports.

The attack failed on that front: the bomb detonated just 15 minutes after take-off, while the plane was only at 11,000 feet, and despite the hole in the plane's fuselage it made a safe emergency landing in Mogadishu.

The two civilians killed in a shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic Friday were Ke'Arre Stewart, a father of two and Army veteran who served in Iraq, and Jennifer Markovsky, a mother of two who was reportedly at the clinic to support a friend.

We all know "password" is no good, and "1234567" is asking for trouble.

But the more we try to strengthen our passwords, the harder we make them to remember.

It's a thoroughly modern problem — but researchers at the University of Southern California have found a very old solution. Instead of passwords, consider the passpoem:

The tiny villagers explore
a speaker company rapport

For sale: lovingly handcrafted shares of Etsy stock, proudly produced in the USA by a team of entrepreneurs, designers and coders. Please note, there may be some variation in size, color and profits.

A decade ago, Etsy launched as a way for crafters and DIY-ers to sell their handmade goods online. Now the New York-based e-commerce site has filed for an initial public offering.

Pages