Jennifer Ludden | KUNC

Jennifer Ludden

Jennifer Ludden helps edit energy and environment stories for NPR's National Desk, working with NPR staffers and a team of public radio reporters across the country. They track the shift to clean energy, state and federal policy moves, and how people and communities are coping with the mounting impacts of climate change.

Previously, Ludden was an NPR correspondent covering family life and social issues, including the changing economics of marriage, the changing role of dads, and the ethical challenges of reproductive technology. She's also covered immigration and national security.

Ludden started reporting with NPR while based overseas in West Africa, Europe and the Middle East. She shared in two awards (Overseas Press Club and Society of Professional Journalists) for NPR's coverage of the Kosovo war in 1999, and won the Robert F. Kennedy Award for her coverage of the overthrow of Mobutu Sese Seko in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When not navigating war zones, Ludden reported on cultural trends, including the dying tradition of storytellers in Syria, the emergence of Persian pop music in Iran, and the rise of a new form of urban polygamy in Africa.

Ludden has also reported from Canada and at public radio stations in Boston and Maine. She's a graduate of Syracuse University with degrees in television, radio, and film production and in English.

As many Americans watch their job benefits shrink amid tight budgets, Connecticut is about to defy the trend: It's set to become the first state to mandate paid sick days for some low-wage workers.

Across the country, 40 million people have no paid sick time, and advocates now see momentum for a national movement.

This story is part of an occasional series.

As more women postpone motherhood into their 30s, even 40s, they're hitting that age-old constraint: the biological clock. Now, technology is dangling the possibility that women can stop that clock, at least for a while.

Since 2004, when Christy Jones launched Extend Fertility, the first U.S. company to market egg freezing as a lifestyle choice, thousands of people have contacted her and hundreds have undergone the procedure. But there's a troublesome disconnect.

The average age of those inquiring is 34 1/2, an ideal time to put one's biological clock on hold. But the average age of the women who actually freeze their eggs is 37 1/2, the upper edge of the recommended range.

A new study suggests that efforts to address the obesity epidemic should include dramatically changing the workday. Some are already dong so, using treadmill desks at work to burn calories. And in Portland, Ore., city officials are trying to get desk-bound workers up and about.

A new study links rising rates of obesity to the increasingly sedentary workplace.

America is aging — a fact that advocates are pushing Congress to consider as it takes up a new transportation bill. Their goal is more safety for older Americans, on both roads and sidewalks.

Pedestrians and cyclists are already far more likely to be hit by cars in the United States than those in some European cities. Add to that the coming tide of older Americans who use walking canes and wheelchairs, and some warn that a road safety crisis looms.

Countdown: Crossing A Busy Street

This story is part of an occasional series.

Today, couples who may never have become parents a generation ago have the wonders of technology to help them. One in every hundred babies in the U.S. is conceived in a laboratory. But because most insurance does not cover fertility treatments, a big barrier remains: money.

The rate of twins and triplets in the U.S. has soared 70 percent in recent decades, thanks in large part to new technologies to overcome infertility. But the rise in multiple births means more premature babies and health complications.

Now, a new study finds that providing insurance coverage for fertility treatments means fewer multiple births.

Pages