Luke Runyon

Reporter

I report on the Colorado River basin and water issues affecting the Western U.S. for KUNC and a network of public media stations in the southwest.

I came to KUNC in March 2013, after spending about two years as a reporter with Aspen Public Radio in Aspen, Colorado. Until September 2017, I was the Colorado reporter for Harvest Public Media, a reporting collaboration that focuses on agriculture and food issues in the Midwest and Great Plains. 

My reports are frequently featured on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Here & Now and APM's Marketplace.

Before moving to Colorado I spent a year covering local and state government for Illinois Public Radio in the state's capital. I have a Master's degree in Public Affairs Reporting from the University of Illinois Springfield.

Ways to Connect

karma-police / Flickr - Creative Commons

There’s more sugar in the United States right now than we know what to do with, a fact that’s concerning to both sugar growers and the processors that use sugar by the truckload, like candy companies and large-scale bakeries.

NRCS

April snow storms have certainly helped parched Colorado. The real question is, how big of a dent will it be?

Granby Lake
Northern Water Conservancy District

Update 4/12/13: The Northern Water board decided Friday to provide water users with a 60 percent quota, about 10 percent less than is usually allotted. 

Kristin Mastre
Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

At a Fort Collins grocery store, Kristin Mastre paused for a minute in front a large bin of Russet and red potatoes. She picked out a few handfuls and continued on, her two boys, Carter, 4, and Logan, 7, in tow.

Centennial Farm
Sara Brooks / Greeley History

History Colorado, the state’s historical society, is on the hunt for farms that have been around for one hundred years or more. 

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's go now to the Great Plains, where farmers are preparing for what could be a tough growing season. They are scrambling to find irrigation water, which is scarce in the midst of the region's persistent drought. In eastern Colorado, thirsty cities have gobbled up water rights for decades, selling what they don't need back to farmers.

As Luke Runyon from member station KUNC reports, the agreement only works when water is plentiful.

Thirsty Cities Drain Colorado Farm Land

Apr 4, 2013
Farmer Kent Peppler
Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Farmers throughout the Great Plains are preparing for what could be a tough growing season. They’re in a tight spot with irrigation water, due to the region’s persistent drought.

NOAA

A new three-month outlook released Thursday, shows Colorado will likely have above average temperatures and below average precipitation.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

Colorado officials touted the state's ability to grow food Tuesday for National Agriculture Day. Another topic captured just as much attention.

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