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Maria Altman

Altman came to St. Louis Public Radio from Dallas where she hosted  All Things Considered and reported north Texas news at KERA. Altman also spent several years in Illinois: first in Chicago where she interned at WBEZ; then as the  Morning Edition host at WSIU in Carbondale; and finally in Springfield, where she earned her graduate degree and covered the legislature for Illinois Public Radio.

A native Iowan, Altman earned her bachelors degree in journalism at the University of Iowa. She remains a devoted Hawkeye. In her free time, Altman likes hiking, swing dancing, and searching for the perfect diner.

  • The competition, called the Arch Grants, gives $50,000 to 20 young businesses. In exchange for the money, the winners will have to move their businesses to St. Louis.
  • In just a few months, Missouri has gone from a record drought that reduced farmers' crop yields to flooding that has hurt in other ways. Earlier this year, the worst drought conditions seen in the Midwest in decades threatened to close the Mississippi River to barge traffic.
  • St. Louis is hoping to hold onto the Rams, even after a dismal football season. The Rams can break their stadium lease if the city doesn't make major upgrades to the facility. St. Louis may have a hard time competing with the team's original hometown of Los Angeles, where there are two major proposals for a new stadium.
  • Across the country, a group of education administrators, known as regional superintendents, are seeing their budgets shrink. These administrators are involved in providing services like teacher certification and other support for school districts. In Illinois, the state's 44 regional superintendents have been working without pay since the governor zeroed out their funding in July. Maria Altman of St. Louis Public Radio reports that the issue of whether or not these officials are needed at all is coming to a head.
  • St. Louis-based US Fidelis sold more than 400,000 faulty contracts before it collapsed in 2009 amid fraud allegations. But Missouri's Better Business Bureau says it's still receiving hundreds of complaints about similar companies marketing auto service contracts.
  • History buffs are visiting famous Civil War battle sites such as Gettysburg and Bull Run this year, to mark the 150th anniversary of the war's beginning. Missouri would like some of that attention; only two states have more Civil War battle sites.