Matt Bloom

Reporter

Matt is a passionate journalist who loves nothing more than good reporting, music and comedy. At KUNC, he covers breaking news stories and the economy. He’s also reported for KPCC and KCRW in Los Angeles. As NPR’s National Desk intern in Culver City during the summer of 2015, he produced one of the first episodes of Embedded, the NPR podcast hosted by Kelly McEvers where reporters take a story from the headlines and “go deep.”

A true Hoosier, he graduated with degrees in Journalism and Spanish from Indiana University. He also executive produced the weekly podcast, American Student Radio, which still broadcasts every Sunday on WIUX 99.1 FM Pure Student Radio, winner of the IBS college award for “Best Large College/University Station.” Matt is a firm believer that everybody has an important story to tell.

Ways to Connect

Jared Tarbell / Flickr-Creative Commons

Drivers beware: Groundbreaking for construction along a 14-mile stretch of I-25 is starting as soon as next month. That means delays as work gets underway.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

When Nancy and Steven Innis built their new home in Greeley, they equipped it with the latest in water conservation tech.

The automatic kitchen faucet shuts off with the wave of a hand. A drip irrigation system keeps yard plants hydrated without the wasteful runoff. Hi-tech toilets save water with different settings for big and small flushes.

Courtesy Virgin Hyperloop One

Imagine getting off your flight at DIA, buckling into a chair inside a pod encased in a vacuum-sealed tube, blasting off at 700 mph and arriving anywhere in northern Colorado under 20 minutes.

That’s the type of mobility promised by new technology dubbed “the hyperloop.”

Luke Runyon / KUNC

An old water cliché tells us that “water flows uphill toward money.” It’s an adage born out of people’s frustrations about who benefits when water moves around in the Western U.S., popularized by author Marc Reisner’s 1986 book, “Cadillac Desert.”

Like all persistent folksy sayings, it’s a mix of myth and truth.

But there’s at least one case where it has some validity: the phenomenon known as “buy and dry” along Colorado’s fast-growing, historically agricultural Front Range.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Updated 3:00 pm Friday, June 8, 2018

A group of 12 governors — including Colorado’s — urged congressional leaders on Friday to pass the STATES Act, calling it an opportunity to restore balance between federal and state powers when it comes to regulating marijuana.

Jim Hill / KUNC

The Longmont City Council has entered a $3 million deal to permanently phase out surface drilling within city limits. As public officials hail the move as a victory over the oil and gas industry, some residents remain unsatisfied. 

Andrew Taylor / Creative Commons

This year, unaffiliated voters in Colorado have a chance to impact not only elections in November, but in the June primaries as well.

Courtesy of the Regional Transportation District (RTD)

More people than ever are using the state’s roads, buses and rail lines to get around. As we learned from your Curious Colorado questions, you have a lot of questions about how the state’s transportation systems will keep up with the ever-growing population.

Colorado Department of Transportation

A major stretch of US highway 34 through Big Thompson Canyon is set to reopen just in time for the Memorial Day holiday.

The route will be accessible to the public starting May 24 at 4 p.m., said Johnny Olson, Colorado Department of Transportation regional director.  

“The Thursday before Memorial weekend we will be opening that up,” he said.

Courtesy Photo, Dave Anderson of InSync Photography + Design.

A statewide coalition of business and community leaders is one step closer to getting a sales tax increase for transportation projects on the November ballot.

On Friday, the group announced it would seek signatures to get an increase of 0.62 percent in front of voters. Before the end of the legislative session, the coalition submitted language for five titles ranging from 0.35 percent to a full 1 percent increase.

Its effort is now focused on just one.

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