Rae Ellen Bichell

Mountain West Reporter

Rae Ellen Bichell reports for the Mountain West News Bureau out of KUNC in Colorado. 

Before joining the team, she covered everything from Ebola to butterfly evolution and space toilets as a science reporter for NPR. She also tried freelancing for a couple years in Helsinki, Finland, originally under a Fulbright grant.

Now based in northern Colorado, she spends her free time reading, playing indoor soccer (not very well) and doing a crazy sport called canyoneering. 

You can reach Rae Ellen at rae.bichell@kunc.org.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of the Amache Preservation Society

In the spring of 1942, official posters went up across the West Coast and Arizona. All people of Japanese ancestry had one week to report to assembly centers. Ultimately, more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans were forcibly imprisoned in internment camps, many of them located in the Mountain West. This week is when we remember those camps and the people who lived in them.

One of them was a 13-year-old boy named Minoru Tonai.

Steele Hill / NASA

The government could be heading into another shutdown Thursday, but some of the places deemed too essential to close are seldom heard of, like this windowless office in Boulder. 

It’s a weather prediction center, but not the usual kind. Instead of talking about snow or rain, these forecasters talk about plumes of molten plasma. The winds they watch travel at a million miles an hour. This office specializes in space weather.

Bob Wick / Bureau of Land Management

Across eight western states, voters increasingly consider themselves to be conservationists, according to a poll out Thursday from the Colorado College “State of the Rockies” Project. The survey also found that westerners largely prioritize protection of air, water and wildlife over energy development.

 

Courtesy Julie Comerford

  Black holes tend to get a bad rap, often as giant, cosmic vacuum cleaners sucking up everything in range. But as researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder recently found, they’re actually a lot like toddlers.

CU astrophysicist Julie Comerford says black holes nap after meals. They’re also messy and somewhat picky eaters.

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