Stacy Nick

Arts, Culture & Music Reporter

Despite being KUNC's resident arts, culture and music expert, I have to admit I couldn't carry a tune in a bucket with a handle. However, I have a deep appreciation for those who do have musical talent, as well as anyone who dances, acts, paints, or otherwise utilizes the creative process.

That's why I've been covering the arts in Colorado for almost two decades. My first big interview was Eagles bassist Randy Meisner and his mom about his induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. I love finding out the backstory behind why artists do what they do and getting to see the process up close. At heart, I'm just a fan.

Ways to Connect

Scott Dressel-Martin / Courtesy of Denver Botanic Gardens

After three years, “Stinky” -- the Denver Botanic Gardens’ beloved corpse flower -- may be preparing to bloom again.

Denver Botanic Gardens horticulturist Nicholas Giaquinto predicted the rare bloom, which is said to give off an odor much like rotting corpse, to occur in early to mid-September.

Officially known as the “amorphophallus titanum,” it’s related to common house plants the philodendron and the peace lily, Giaquinto said. The rancid smell is used to attract pollinators such as flies and beetles.

The potent plant also attracts humans.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

For 30 years, Annie Hamilton has handled casting for many of the television and film projects made in Colorado -- including, most recently, the Jane Fonda/Robert Redford Netflix film, “Our Souls at Night.”

Recently, Hamilton helped conduct an open-casting call for a brand of actor that is becoming more and more sought after in Colorado: “real people.”

“We’re steering away from the beauty and skinny,” she said. “They want real because that’s who the consumers are. That’s who their audience is.”

Stacy Nick / KUNC

It just makes sense to meet with CU Denver history professor Tom Noel -- also known as “Dr. Colorado” -- at History Colorado Center’s exhibit "Zoom In: The Centennial State in 100 Objects." From the Native American pottery of Mesa Verde to John Denver’s guitar, each of the 100 items tells a part of the state’s history.

“I like to tell my students, those who flunk history are doomed to repeat it,” he said.

Depending on the story, that might not be so bad.

Courtesy of Denver Fire Department

For the second time in a week, parts of Denver’s Civic Center Park have been damaged.

Over the weekend, a hit-and-run driver took out part of the park’s more than 100-year-old marble balustrade. Wednesday, the interactive installation “Tree of Transformation” was set on fire. The sculpture, which features an antique piano with a steel tree growing out of it, was a total loss.

“The edge of the park in particular has taken a bit of a beating lately,” said Scott Robson, executive director of the Civic Center Conservancy. Especially the part of the park along Colfax Avenue, which Robson described as a bit of a “war zone.”

Stacy Nick / KUNC

When Art Comes to Town: This story is the second in a series as KUNC arts and culture reporter Stacy Nick explores the impact art has on Colorado communities — and the impact those communities have on the art that comes out of them.

Sun Valley is one of Denver’s poorest neighborhoods. More than 80 percent of households live below the poverty line and 70 percent of residents are unemployed. It also has the highest violent-crime rate, more than five times the citywide average.

But between a public-housing initiative, a proposed mixed‐use neighborhood near the home of the Denver Broncos and several arts destinations moving into the area, Sun Valley is set to see more than a billion dollars in investments in the next five years.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

It’s hard to imagine a Fourth of July celebration without certain things — cookouts, fireworks, the American flag and the singing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” But for many, Francis Scott Key’s iconic song can sound a little sour.

Courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Bet you never thought about Mozart and methane going together, did you? One music festival is doing just that: combining classical music and climate science.

It might seem a little strange to some, but that’s kind of the idea, said Jephta Bernstein, executive artistic director for Off the Hook Arts. The Fort Collins music education program is using the theme Mission Earth for its SummerFest 2018 series.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

Since 1909, Greeley Hat Works, or The Shining Parlor as it was named back then, has been making hats.

“I’m the fourth hatmaker to own it, and I’ve been doing this about 25 years,” said owner Trent Johnson.

And while hat styles may have changed a lot over the last 109 years, the equipment used to make them really hasn't.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

Crowds of Spider Men and Wonder Women descended upon the Colorado Convention Center on Friday for the first day of the seventh annual Denver Comic Con.

Courtesy of Corky Scholl

It was his father, Morry, who got Glen Weseloh into the neon business.

“My dad had been bending since the end of WWII,” Weseloh said. “When he got to be 65, the union came to him and said, ‘You can no longer work and receive all your benefits.’”

But Weseloh wasn’t about to let his dad give up doing what he loved. So in 1985 the duo went into business together, and Morry’s Neon Signs was born.

Pages