Stephanie Daniel

Education Reporter

I grew up in Denver and, after living out-of-state for many years, am happy to be back in Colorado covering education, opioid addiction and news for KUNC.

My reporting on the opioid epidemic has been featured on the award-winning podcast The Fix: Treating New York's Opioid Crisis and NPR's Latino USA and The Pulse.

Before joining KUNC in October 2017, I worked at New York Public Radio and on the podcasts Revisionist History and Empire on Blood. Prior to journalism, I wrote and produced commercials and marketing videos for TV shows and media companies. I am a graduate of Duke University and CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

I love going on adventures and have visited more than 20 countries. I also like to explore local areas, ride my bike and hang out with my family and friends.

biologycorner / Flickr

This week, the Department of Education released results from the 2018 statewide assessments, along with the academic growth summary, providing some insight on how students, schools and districts are doing compared to their cohorts.

Michael Forsberg

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Kery Harrelson, the IT Director for East Grand School District in Granby, Colorado, responded, saying he 'crisscrossed' the Continental Divide.

His summer break essay follows:

Over my summer break I walked about 180 miles.

I've been the IT Director for East Grand Schools for well over a decade but have worked several side and summer jobs as well. I've been a bellman, a raft guide, freelance computer tech, network engineer and graphic designer. Colorado home prices can be prohibitively high so my side jobs - especially my latest - have been essential in augmenting my income and ultimately allowing me to buy my house.

Ben Brown

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Ben Brown, a sixth grade science and design thinking teacher in Summit County, responded, saying he spent 20 years working in the private sector before becoming a teacher. He loves teaching.

His summer break essay follows:

Over my summer break, I launched a business.

The last bell of the school year rang. I watched students stream out of the school, excited about what summer will bring. Their excitement is always so infectious. I packed up my classroom, I completed my end of year checklist, high fived my colleagues and then headed out of the building myself.

If you ever hear a teacher say they don't like summer break, I think they're lying. I love summer.

Sarah Weeks

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Sarah Weeks, a K-5 media specialist and STEM teacher at Lopez Elementary School in Fort Collins, responded, saying she loves her job but can't live off her teaching salary alone.

Her summer break essay follows:

Maya Angelou said, "My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style."

I'm discovering that this quote captures the essence of my philosophy of life and my career as a professional educator.

Katie Lazar / Serve Colorado

Denver ranked fifth among large cities with the highest number of residents who choose to serve in AmeriCorps programs.

Every year the Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers national service and volunteer programs, ranks the cities and states that produce the most AmeriCorps members.

Barbara Stewart, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service, said there's a spirit of service and volunteerism in Denver that's infectious.

Daniel Lobo / Flickr

It's back-to-school time and parents, teachers and students are busy shopping for supplies. But according to a new report some of these products contain toxic chemicals that could be harmful.

ILO in Asia and the Pacific / Flickr

Gov. John Hickenlooper wants the federal government to withdraw a proposed rule that restricts conversations health care professionals can have with their patients.

On July 30 Hickenlooper sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services asking that it remove the "Compliance With Statutory Program Integrity Requirements" rule.

Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

Scott Kindel lives in Louisville, Colorado with his wife and 2-year-old son. He began drinking at 12 before moving on to his mom's prescription pain pills at 14, and then finally, heroin. Kindel's addiction to opioids almost killed him

"I'm driving on I-70 with my right arm sticking out as he shoots me up for the first time as I'm going 60, 70 miles an hour down the road," he said. "And I just immediately pass out."

Ashley Jefcoat / KUNC

Ally Shea's kitchen is very bright. The high ceilings and two-tone blue and white cabinets make it feel spacious. She said she has about 5 feet of counter space.

That's significant, as Shea, along with her husband Kevin Martin and their three-year-old twin boys, live in a so-called "tiny house."

Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

Coloradans love locally brewed craft beer and it appears the rest of the country does, too.

Pages