Sunday Puzzle: Words That End In -LLO

Nov 17, 2019
Originally published on November 17, 2019 8:41 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word or name that ends in the letters -LLO.

Ex. Standard greeting --> HELLO

1. Dessert that jiggles

2. Winemaker Ernest or Julio

3. 1960s-'70s U.S. space program

4. Brand of scouring pad

5. Largest city in the Texas Panhandle

6. Abbott's partner in old comedy

7. Animal with a leathery shell much seen in Texas and the Southwest

8. Italian sculptor of the Renaissance; also one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

9. Kind of mushroom

10. Island in New Brunswick, Canada where F.D.R. had a summer home

11. Highly caffeinated, citrus-flavored soft drink

Last week's challenge: This challenge comes from Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. Think of two five-letter words that are opposites. One of them begins with E, the other ends with E. Drop both E's. The remaining eight letters can be rearranged to spell a new word that is relevant. What are these three words?

Challenge answer: Enter, Leave, Relevant

Winner: Michael Balch of Wheat Ridge, Colorado

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from Janet McDonald of Baton Rouge, La. The city of Mobile, Ala., has the interesting property that the name of the city has exactly the same consonants as its state (M, B, and L), albeit in a different order. What is the next-largest U.S. city for which this is true?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. ET.

: 11/16/19

In a previous version of this story and radio interview, we incorrectly said that Campobello Island is in Maine. Campobello Island is in New Brunswick, Canada.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hey there, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yeah. It came from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. It was a little tricky but not too hard. I said, think of two five-letter words that are opposites. One starts with E; the other ends with E. Drop both of the E's, and the remaining eight letters can be rearranged to spell a new word that is relevant. What are the three words? Well, the words are enter and leave. Drop the two E's, and you can rearrange those eight letters to spell relevant.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received 1,239 correct responses, and the winner this week is Michael Balch of Wheat Ridge, Colo. Congratulations.

MICHAEL BALCH: Thank you very much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How'd you solve it?

BALCH: Well, enter and leave came pretty quickly, and once we were rearranging the other letters, it became obvious that, oh, that word is actually relevant.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And what do you do?

BALCH: I'm actually retired, so I just - I do crossword puzzles (laughter) and, you know, play my guitar, a little bit of ukulele.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You're leaving something out. I hear you go to space launches, and I'm a super space fan.

BALCH: Yes, yes. I went to the last Falcons - Falcon Heavy launch down at Cape Canaveral. I'm into it. You know, the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing brought back a lot, a lot of memories for me. Yeah. In Waterton Canyon, Martin Marietta built the main booster for the Titan II rocket, which was used for the Gemini missions. And whenever they tested that engine, we could actually hear it and feel it at our house.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, really? Wow. That's amazing. Well, are you ready to take off and play the Puzzle?

BALCH: Yes. I'm a little apprehensive but excited.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) All right. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right. Michael, every answer today is a word or name that ends in the letters L-L-O. For example, if I said standard greeting, you would say hello.

BALCH: OK.

SHORTZ: OK. No. 1 is a dessert that jiggles.

BALCH: Jell-O.

SHORTZ: That's it. Winemaker Ernest or Julio.

BALCH: Gallo.

SHORTZ: Good. 1960s-'70s U.S. space program.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You should know this.

BALCH: (Laughter) Apollo.

SHORTZ: No trouble with that one. A brand of scouring pad.

BALCH: Brillo.

SHORTZ: Right. Largest city in the Texas panhandle.

BALCH: Largest city in the Texas panhandle.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It's - in Spanish, it means yellow.

BALCH: Oh.

SHORTZ: There you go.

BALCH: And I did not do well in my (laughter) Spanish I class in high school. OK. Oh, Amarillo, Amarillo, right, Amarillo.

SHORTZ: There you go. All right. Abbott's partner in old comedy.

BALCH: Costello.

SHORTZ: That's it. Animal with a leathery shell, much seen in Texas in the Southwest.

BALCH: (Laughter) Armadillo.

SHORTZ: That's it. Italian sculptor of the Renaissance.

BALCH: Italian sculptor of the Renaissance...

SHORTZ: And what if I told you it's also the name of one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles?

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I think that's harder for him.

BALCH: Oh, that's right on the tip of my tongue - Donnatell (ph) - Donatello?

SHORTZ: Donatello - that's it. That's it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job.

SHORTZ: A kind of mushroom.

BALCH: A kind of mushroom - unfortunately, I don't eat mushrooms, though.

SHORTZ: Starts with a P.

BALCH: Oh...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It means beautiful port in Italian.

SHORTZ: There you go.

BALCH: Beautiful port in Italian - oh, portobello, of course.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go.

SHORTZ: Portobello, good. And your last one is a double. It's a highly caffeinated, citrus-flavored soft drink.

BALCH: Highly caffeinated, citrus-flavored...

SHORTZ: It's a brand name.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: They call me...

BALCH: Mello Yello?

SHORTZ: Mello Yello is it. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did great. How do you feel? That was a lot of fun.

BALCH: Relieved.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I'm really glad. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. Michael, which member station do you listen to?

BALCH: KCFR 90.1, a contributing member.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Michael Balch of Wheat Ridge, Colo. Thank you so much for playing the Puzzle.

BALCH: Thank you so much; so great to meet you guys.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah. It was great to have you. All right, Will, what's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from Janet McDonald of Baton Rouge, La. And she says Mobile, Ala., has the interesting property that the name of the city has exactly the same consonants as its state - M, B and L, albeit in a different order. What is the next largest U.S. city for which this is true? So, again, you want to think of a U.S. city and the state whose names contain exactly the same consonants but in different order. What is the next largest U.S. city after Mobile, Ala., for which this is true?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry per person please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, November 21, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's very own puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.