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The Senate appears poised to approve a measure that would bar the Obama administration from prosecuting Guantanamo detainees in the U.S.

The legislation imposes new restrictions on sending terrorism suspects to other countries, too -- all but killing the only part of the White House detention strategy that's still working.

The legislative push by a Democratic-controlled Congress is only the latest trouble to befall the Obama approach to the prison camp. And activists on both sides of the political aisle are decrying lawmakers, though for different reasons.

Over the weekend, the Senate failed to approve the so-called DREAM Act. It's a measure that would have given some young illegal immigrants a pathway to citizenship.

Pedro Ramirez, 22, was a toddler when his parents brought him to this country. It wasn’t until his junior year in high school that he learned they had brought him here illegally. That news disrupted his plans to enlist in the service.

"That was my first choice," Ramirez said. "To serve in some branch of the military, a lot of my friends were doing it, so I was hoping to join them."

There are a few things we're all taught to notice about the Declaration of Independence: the famous preamble, the phrase "all men are created equal," the defiantly large signature of John Hancock. But off to the right of Hancock's name is the cramped signature of a man few Americans have ever heard of. His name was Robert Morris, the nation's founding capitalist and the financier of its revolution.

Perhaps the best line in Erica Kane's Wikipedia entry is this one: "Seven of her marriages to six different men have been valid while four of her other marriages are invalid."

On Friday's Morning Edition, Don Gonyea talks about holiday tipping with self-styled tipping expert Steve Dublanica. Dublanica is a longtime food server who wrote the book Waiter Rant, based on his blog of the same name, as well as this year's Keep The Change: A Clueless Tipper's Quest To Become The Guru Of The Gratuity.

The prestigious literary magazine Granta, based in London, has been anointing the best new writers for decades, often predicting some of the world's biggest names (they discovered a new writer on the scene named Salman Rushdie, for example). But for the winter issue this year, the editors turned away from Britain and America and to Spain and Latin America, choosing to dedicate an issue to the best new writing emerging from the Spanish-speaking world.

European leaders are convening in Brussels on Thursday to discuss ways to steer the continent out of a debt crisis that shows few signs of abating, despite two multibillion-euro bailouts and European Central Bank moves to buy bonds of debt-ridden countries.

Most people travel for fun or because they have to, but for a select few, travel is a competition. The goal: See as much of the world as possible.

Robert Bonifas and Don Parrish are two such travelers, a sort of extreme Hope and Crosby.

I met the two Americans over breakfast one morning at the Acropole, a hotel in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. They had come to Khartoum to see the sights and check off one more place in their quest to see the entire planet.

When it comes to America's approach to food, poet Maya Angelou says too much rushing around -- and too many rules -- are enough to crush good cooking. Eating good food, she says, should be a time to enlighten the spirit.

Talking with Morning Edition guest host Don Gonyea about the food of her childhood in Stamps, Ark., Angelou says her family always ate vegetables from her grandmother's garden.

If there's one kind of book that you'd think might be safe from the digital revolution it's the cookbook.

It's hard to imagine how the Web could replicate a cookbook's well-organized recipes or enticing illustrations -- and, of course, a book doesn't freeze or short out after a cooking accident. And cookbooks make the perfect gift for the foodie on anyone's list, which is why they're a mainstay of publishing at this time of year.

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