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Samsung

  • The decision is the latest in a tit-for-tat legal battle between the two electronics giants matched only by their heated competition in the smartphone market.
  • On July 4, Jay-Z will release his album, Magna Carta Holy Grail, via an app that will be available to Samsung smart phone users three days before its wider release. It's not the first branding promotion between the tech and music industries, but it may be the highest profile.
  • The U.S. International Trade Commission's ruling affects some older models of the iPhone and iPad. President Obama has 60 days to overturn the order; Apple said it will appeal.
  • Samsung announced Friday its first quarter profit is at a record high — net profit surged 42 percent. The company has now seen six straight quarters of growth, thanks to strong smartphone sales. On Saturday, it's launching a new smartphone in the U.S. — the Galaxy S4.
  • In 1995, Samsung's chairman set more than 100,000 phones on fire in front of his employees. The message was clear: make better quality or "I'll come back and do the same thing."
  • South Korean company Samsung is the world leader in smartphone and cell phone sales. Bloomberg journalist Sam Grobart gained access to the company's headquarters, and wrote about his findings in Bloomberg Businessweek. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks to Growbart about some of the surprising things he found within the company, and how it became a global powerhouse.
  • The company's long-term position in the smartphone market is complicated because of its historical association with hardware. One analyst says that what really matters to consumers are the software and new experiences.
  • The judge took issue with the legal theory the original jury used to reach its decision. The judge ordered a new trial to determine the damages.
  • Corporations pay millions to have their products turn up in the hands of famous people. But cellphone makers were not thrilled when a photo showed a smartphone on a table next to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. This set off fevered speculation about which brand it was.
  • On today's show, we talk with a Stanford law professor about the problems with software patents — and how to fix the system.