2020 Election

Democrats onstage during their party's presidential debate were quick to condemn President Trump's abrupt and unilateral decision to withdraw U.S. forces from Syria. But their responses as to what role the U.S. should play in the region were generally cloudier.

Trump's decision last week appeared to set in motion a Turkish incursion into northern Syria and the advancement of Turkish-backed militias against Kurdish forces that had helped the United States battle ISIS.

The fourth Democratic debate was a long one, about three hours, and ended after 11 p.m. ET.

You might not have made it through the whole thing, but there were some potentially consequential moments.

Here are six takeaways:

1. The scrutiny came for Warren, and her vulnerabilities were exposed some

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts was under fire Tuesday night from several opponents, and when that happens to a candidate, you know they're a front-runner.

Angela Hsieh / NPR

Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate in Westerville, Ohio, has some key differences from the last three. This time, there is an ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Trump, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is catching up to former Vice President Joe Biden in the polls and businessman Tom Steyer is making his debut to the debate stage.

Scott Franz / Capitol Coverage

More Coloradans are thinking about climate change as a serious issue, and that's changing how voters are approaching the upcoming 2020 senate race.

Democratic presidential hopefuls called for increased firearms restrictions at a forum organized by gun control advocates in Las Vegas Wednesday.

The group largely agreed on measures like reinstating the so-called assault weapons ban and universal background checks, though some called for gun buybacks.Others cautioned against going too far and endangering more politically feasible changes.

Leigh Paterson / KUNC

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke reiterated his support for gun control measures such as an assault weapons ban during a rally in Aurora on Thursday night.

Standing in front of Aurora’s municipal center, O’Rourke was joined by people whose loved ones were killed in the Aurora theatre shooting in 2012. Colorado State Representative Tom Sullivan, who introduced him, lost his son. Lonnie and Sandy Phillips, who stood close by, lost their daughter.  

 

Hickenlooper
Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

John Hickenlooper on Thursday ended his longshot bid for the Democratic presidential nomination and said he may run for the Senate in 2020 against a Republican considered one of the most politically vulnerable incumbents.

The former Colorado governor and Denver mayor made the announcement via YouTube video, where he's shown sitting on a sunny porch, thanking his supporters.

During the first night of the second Democratic presidential debate, the question of how to reduce gun violence emerged as one issue on which the sometimes-splintered Democratic Party speaks with as close to one voice as it can.

"As your president, I will not fold," vowed Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., before rattling off her list of proposals, which included background checks, an assault weapons ban and "something" about magazines.

Angela Hsieh / NPR

It's Night 1 of the July Democratic debates. Ten candidates are each making the case that they should be the next president of the United States.

Follow NPR's live coverage for real-time fact checks and analysis of their remarks.

Luis Melgar / Guns & America

Polling shows guns are among the top priorities for many Democratic voters and gun issues remain a big topic in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

The candidates spent precious minutes talking about their gun-related proposals during the first round of debates. Gun control groups spent big — and won big — in the 2018 midterms, including in a few key races that helped Democrats retake control of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Pages