Animals/Wildlife

Just about everyone loves puppies. But around the country, there's heated disagreement about where, and from whom, people can get one.

While the large national pet store chains don't sell dogs, other chains and shops do. But in several states, including Florida, cities are passing laws that ban puppy sales in pet stores.

At the Petland store in Plantation, Fla., a suburb of Ft. Lauderdale, customers come in all day long to look at and play with the puppies. At this store, in fact, doggie accessories and puppies are all that owner Vicki Siegel sells.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Pacific Region

In late 2015, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will decide whether to list the Greater Sage Grouse as an endangered or threatened species.  In preparation for this decision, another federal agency, the Bureau of Land Management, is coordinating a set of plans aimed at protecting the bird and keeping it off the endangered species list.

A group of sage grouse scientists, however, say those plans lack sound science and fail to adequately protect the grouse.

Grace Hood / KUNC

Inside Rocky Mountain National Park, the fall colors and snow-capped mountains make for spectacular sightseeing. But some park visitors aren't there for the grandeur. They're there with their sandwiches, chips and blankets ready for a different kind of Colorado sporting event: the annual elk mating season.

Enter the elk rut tailgate.

‘Ag-Gag’ Law May Have Hindered Report Of Animal Cruelty At Missouri Hog Farm

Oct 3, 2014
Courtesy PETA

A recent Missouri law meant to protect farmers may be making it harder to report alleged animal abuse, as animal welfare organizations have feared.

Tom Koerner / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Rolling sagebrush-covered foothills may seem like an almost commonplace symbol of the American West, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service calls it "one of the most imperiled ecosystems in America," threatened and fragmented by invasive species, wildfire, and development.

Loss of quality habitat has led to steep declines in the numbers of greater sage grouse, a bird that lives and breeds in the sagebrush. Because of this, many Western states are working on plans to improve and preserve the sagebrush steppe the birds rely on. Now, two new studies show that saving sagebrush can benefit more than just the grouse.

Peat the kitten quickly made a name for himself at the Glenturret Distillery in Scotland.

Officially, his job was to kill the mice attracted to the grain used in the making of whisky. And he had big paws to fill. One of his predecessors at the distillery, Towser the Mouser, is in the Guinness Book of World Records, credited with killing 28,899 mice.

There aren't many mice around the distillery anymore, but the photogenic Peat has been warming hearts with his appearances in public relations photos for Scotland's oldest distillery.

A few years ago, award-winning animal photographer Seth Casteel became an overnight sensation when his photos of dogs underwater went viral. What followed was a book deal that resulted in the New York Times best-seller Underwater Dogs.

Casteel's new book, out Sept. 16, is possibly the only thing cuter than Underwater Dogs: Underwater Puppies.

Glenn Asakawa / University of Colorado

A few years ago, wildlife biologists responsible for protecting and stocking a rare, native Colorado fish – the greenback cutthroat trout – learned they'd been saving the wrong fish.

Jimmy Thomas / Flickr-Creative Commons

A wild rabbit in Fort Collins recently tested positive for a disease called tularemia, a very infectious disease that can sicken humans as well as animals, the Larimer County Health Department reported.

So how worried should you be?

Behind the scenes at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, there's a vast, warehouse-like room that's filled with metal cabinets painted a drab institutional green. Inside the cabinets are more than a half-million birds — and these birds are not drab. Their colorful feathers make them seem to almost glow.

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