Arts & Life

Stories from KUNC, NPR & others on Life, Religion, Arts, Culture, Movies, Books, Theater, Entertainment & more...

Lost Highways: The Dearest Field

Feb 15, 2020
Courtesy History Colorado

In the aftermath of the American Civil War, all-Black settlements sprang up throughout the West as formerly enslaved people and their descendants sought to build a better life. In this episode, Noel and Tyler look back at one of those communities in Colorado.

Courtesy of Kyle Borthick

Updated 2/17/2019 at 11:30 a.m.

Investigators with the Larimer County Sheriff's Office arrested Kevin Dean Eastman, of Greeley, on Feb. 16 in connection with the homicide of Scott Sessions.

Eastman was booked on allegations of first-degree murder and tampering with a deceased human body, along with an outstanding warrant from the Denver Police Department. No additional details are being released at this time.

Lost Highways: The Passion of Alan Berg

Feb 14, 2020
Courtesy History Colorado

Noel and Tyler spin the dial on the talk radio time machine to meet Alan Berg, the loud-mouthed Denver media personality who helped pioneer the “outrage for profit”  business model that drives political media today. Berg was on his way to stardom until his assassination by neo-Nazis in 1984.

Lost Highways: Bonsai Behind Barbed Wire

Feb 14, 2020
Courtesy History Colorado

Tyler and Noel set out to investigate an alleged feud between two bickering bonsai clubs. But their quest leads them instead to Amache, a WWII prison camp for people of Japanese ancestry in southeast Colorado.

Lost Highways: Six Gay Weddings And A Horse

Feb 9, 2020
Courtesy History Colorado

In 1975, a newly-elected Boulder County Clerk named Clela Rorex had just settled into her job when two men walked into the courthouse and asked for a marriage license. Her decision would reverberate across four decades of LGBTQ history, and ultimately help redefinte marriage as we know it.

MENEMSHA Films

There are reasons for events like the Jewish film festival – and other festivals that celebrate and explore identities and cultures. One side of the equation is that mainstream films ignore things that make human beings distinct and interesting. But people want – and need – to see themselves and their ways of life taken seriously on screen. Another side of the equation is that it’s fascinating to see how other people live and think – and also to realize that human beings are the same in a lot of ways.

Matt Stensland / Steamboat Fireworks

On the evening of Saturday, Feb. 8, Steamboat Fireworks will make their second attempt for a record for setting off the world’s largest firework during the annual Steamboat Winter Carnival.

Tim Borden, the group's project manager, joined KUNC’s Colorado Edition to discuss the endeavor.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

For Fort Collins-based photographer Elliot Ross, the camera has always been a way of finding comfort, ever since coming to Colorado from Taiwan.

"When I moved here, I was 4 and incredibly shy," Ross said. "It was a big transition moving from Taipei to a very rural situation. And my grandma gave me a camera. She thought maybe that might help ease some of that anxiety. And it certainly did. It became a fixture of my daily life."

Molly Albright / Amazone Studios

Every review of the new Les Misérables will probably start the same way – this movie is not the megahit Les Mis or anything like it. It’s not even an adaptation of the original 1862 novel by Victor Hugo. The movie is directed and co-written by Ladj Ly, born in Mali, and this Les Misérables is unique.

Daniel Chehayl / Courtesy of the Ouray Ice Park

The 25th annual Ouray Ice Festival, a celebration of ice climbing, began on Thursday and runs through Sunday in Ouray, Colorado in the southwestern part of the state.  

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