Bees

Extreme temperatures are driving a dramatic decline in bumblebees across North America and Europe, according to a new study, in yet another way climate change is putting ecosystems at risk.

Researchers looked at half a million records showing where bumblebees have been found since 1901, across 66 different species. They found that in places where bumblebees have lived in North America, you're about half as likely to see one today.

The decline is especially pronounced in Mexico, where bumblebees once lived in abundance.

The Environmental Protection Agency is expanding the use of an insecticide that is toxic to bees. The move affects more than 17 million acres of farmland in our region.

 


Over the next few weeks, we're going to take you on a tour of some of our favorite public lands.  

Most people visit Curt Gowdy State Park in Southeastern Wyoming for the world-class mountain biking, reservoirs filled with rainbow trout, and hikes through steep granite formations.

But entomologist Christy Bell comes for the bees.

Wikimedia Commons

Bees are in trouble. Master arborist Kevin Marks with the Davey Tree Expert Company says many factors contribute to the decline of the tiny buzzing insect that pollinates our food loss of habitat, parasites, pesticides, to name a few.

 

And that’s why this is National Pollinator Week.

 

“Pollinators are what allow us to eat the foods we eat on a daily basis,” says Marks.