Broomfield

VIBE 105 / Flickr

[Updated June 12, 2018, 3:25 p.m.] The cities of Lakewood and Wheat Ridge also filed a lawsuit against the nation's largest opioid manufacturers, including Purdue Pharma, Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Cephalon, Johnson & Johnson, Janssen, Endo and Mallinckrodt, in U.S. District Court in Denver on June 8.

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Boulder County and 12 other local governments want to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable for skyrocketing rates of opioid abuse, overdoses and deaths in their communities. According to the Denver Post , they plan to file a lawsuit to force the companies to pay a penalty and change their practices for marketing the drugs.

MiraCosta Community College / flickr

School District 27J will become the first metro Denver area district to implement a four-day week.

Starting in August, students will be off Mondays, but Tuesday through Friday school days could be extended up to an extra hour and a half to ensure students receive the same classroom time.

Parents in need of childcare for Mondays can send their younger K-5 children to a district-run daycare. They will have to find other options for older kids.

Leigh Paterson / Insider Energy

In Northern Colorado, two massive industries are colliding: home development and energy development. At the intersection of the two are serious and growing concerns about health and safety.

As more drilling rigs and more subdivisions go up in towns across the Front Range, what happens when people and oil and gas become neighbors?

Leigh Paterson / Inside Energy

Pro-drilling groups are pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into the local election in Broomfield, fighting a measure that could give the town more control over drilling. Ballot Question 301 is part of a much larger fight over health, safety, policy and state law that's playing out in towns across Colorado’s Front Range as oil and gas development moves in.

Luke Runyon / KUNC/Harvest Public Media

Few things are more valuable to a farmer in the arid West than irrigation water. Without it, the land turns back into its natural state: dry, dusty plains. If a fast-growing city is your neighbor, then your water holds even more value.

Farm families in Western states like California and Colorado are increasingly under pressure to sell their water. It’s been coined “buy and dry,” as water is diverted from farm fields and instead used to fill pipes in condos and subdivisions.

Buy and dry deals are usually cut behind closed doors, in quiet, unassuming meetings. A city approaches a farmer, or a farmer approaches a city, and strikes a deal. But a recent public auction in Loveland, Colorado threw the doors wide open, bringing myriad bidders and interests into one room to duke it out. It gives a glimpse of the unique stresses and opportunities farmers face in parched portions of the West.

Ryan Moehring / USFWS

A greenway to connect Denver with Rocky Mountain National Park would provide greater access to wildlife refuges by foot and by bike, but some say the plan would put nature lovers at risk. That’s because part of the trail will snake through Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge, the site of a former nuclear weapons manufacturing facility.

With the deadline for a funding grant looming, several cities have chosen sides -- will they contribute to the effort to secure the federal money or not -- and Arvada is the next in line.

Dan Boyce / Inside Energy

Colorado Supreme Court justices unanimously ruled that state laws protecting the oil and gas industry overrule a hydraulic fracturing ban in Longmont [.pdf] and a five-year moratorium in Fort Collins [.pdf], calling both of the voter-approved moves "invalid and unenforceable." While the industry sees the decision as a big win, opponents view the ballot box as the likely outlet now for gaining more local control.

Fort Collins and Longmont's oil and gas control measures were the headline examples, but they weren't alone in the state. What happens now with similar efforts in Boulder County and Broomfield?

Stephanie Paige Ogburn

Standing in his backyard on an unseasonably warm day in Fort Collins, Peter Workman is modeling a winter coat. It's nylon, forest green, and falls about mid-thigh on his slender frame.

Workman takes the coat off and shows off the label, sewn in by his grandmother: "Made from a Frostline Kit. Broomfield, Colo." This coat, handmade over 40 years ago, is a piece of Colorado outdoor history.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

Since June 2014, home prices in Northern Colorado rose more than they did in metro Denver, according to numbers released by the Colorado Association of Realtors.

Statewide, the median sales price for a home has increased 11.4 percent. In the region including Boulder, Broomfield, Larimer and Weld counties, prices have gone up 15.6 percent in that year-long span; in the metro Denver region, the increase was 13.7 percent.

Grace Hood / KUNC

Updated: A Dec. 18 district court hearing had been set to hear a case between Broomfield election officials and a pro-fracking group over voting irregularities with a 5-year fracking moratorium that voters narrowly approved. It has been delayed pending another case.

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