Colorado Parks and Wildlife

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Wildlife officials are asking for the public's help to determine what caused thousands of fish to die in a northern Colorado river.

The Fort Collins Coloradoan reports Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking if anyone noticed changes in water quality or fish behavior on the Poudre River between Sept. 19 and Sept. 21.

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Colorado wildlife officials are trying to track down mountain lions sighted in Boulder, including the one that became trapped inside a home and killed a house cat last week.

El Paso County

Officials say hundreds of fish were killed last week during the devastating hailstorm that hit areas near Colorado Springs.

Courtesy of CSU

A new safety campaign from Colorado State University’s communications and natural resources departments is teaching national park visitors about safe selfies.

The Safe Wildlife Distance program includes educational materials for park staff, as well as ads and social media campaigns explaining how to get a good photo of wild animals without putting yourself -- or the animal -- at risk.

“Potentially people didn’t know what a safe distance was,” said Katie Abrams, an assistant professor in CSU’s Department of Journalism and Media Communication. “So, they would look to try to read the cues of the wildlife and see if they could make a determination or they would approach the wildlife to a distance that felt safe to them.”

William A. Cotton / Colorado State University Photography

The first bison calf to be conceived using in vitro fertilization has died. The 11-month-old calf, named IVF1, was part of the Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd.

Fire experts say this season could be big for wildfires in our region. Our Mountain West New Bureau takes you behind the scenes with stories about the people who protect our communities, land and wildlife during wildlfire season. 

This story is about the people who rush into the smoke not to save people or structures, but … animals.  

William A. Cotton / Colorado State University Photography

The first calf born through in vitro fertilization is now part of the Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd. The calf, a 10-month-old named IVF1, is also the first in the world to be conceived using eggs and sperm collected from Yellowstone bison, one of the last genetically pure herds in the country.

IVF1 was released into the herd – along with her mother and three other calves and their mothers – in mid-March, boosting the herd, which lives at Soapstone Prairie Natural Area and Red Mountain Open Space, from 36 to 44 animals.

Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

On crisp, sunny morning in February, Jennifer Barfield threw large vegetable pellets from her car window. She was trying to lure a distant herd of bison closer.

It worked. The large brown animals – also known as buffalo – came right up to the car.

“Nothing like being chased by a herd of bison on Sunday morning,” Barfield joked.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Standing at the edge of the Cache La Poudre River in Fort Collins, Boyd Wright adjusted his sunglasses against the bright sunlight. He pointed to the Fossil Creek ditch, a diversion structure dividing the waterway.

Photo courtesy of Tim Nicholson

Colorado is home to more than 19,000 black bears, all focused on consuming thousands of pounds of calories a day as they prepare for their long winter's sleep. That's bringing them into more conflicts with humans, especially as they explore neighborhoods for trash and ripe fruit fallen from trees. Recently, bears been seen going from car to car in Aspen, trying door handles. They also broke into an Estes Park restaurant and raided the refrigerator.

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