Craft Beer

As America's craft beer industry continues to boom, the waste it generates can pose challenges for sewer systems. But if it's used in the right spot, in the right amount, it's potentially beneficial and can actually save wastewater treatment plants money.

In Bozeman, Mont., the Water Reclamation Facility treats more than 6 million gallons of water every day from sinks, showers, toilets — really anything that goes down a drain. That includes liquid waste from more than 10 breweries in this city of nearly 50,000.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Protesters hoping to stop New Belgium Brewing’s pending sale to a subsidiary of international beer conglomerate Kirin Holdings made their case to top executives on Saturday, just days before voting on the deal was set to finish. 

 

After demonstrators gathered outside the Fort Collins brewery, chanting and holding handwritten signs reading “KIRIN FUNDS GENOCIDE,” co-founder Kim Jordan approached the group and invited them inside to talk. KUNC did not gain entry to the meeting. 

 

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Mary Collins, a lifelong resident of Fort Collins, didn’t expect to feel so nostalgic. During happy hour at Road 34, a local bar just west of Colorado State University, she sat down at a long wooden table with a group of friends and a glass of New Belgium Citradelic in her hand.

“Figured I’d get some in before they sell out and I end up buying Odell,” Collins said.

When Athletic Brewing Co. offered its nonalcoholic limited-edition Double Hop IPA for sale online last week, it sold out in 32 seconds.

"We've actually been totally overwhelmed and shocked by how strong the nationwide online demand is," says Bill Shufelt, co-founder of Athletic Brewing Co., which produces only nonalcoholic brews.

Two major craft beer companies are joining forces.

Dogfish Head Brewery and The Boston Beer Co. — the maker of Samuel Adams Boston Lager — announced Thursday that they have reached an agreement to merge. The deal, which is expected to close late in the second quarter of this year, is valued at about $300 million in cash and stock.

This might surprise you, but Americans seem to be losing their taste for beer. Even the dizzy growth we've seen in the microbrew industry is slowing down. Craft beer producers are trying to buck this trend, which involves figuring out how to be competitive with each other as well as the newer kid on the block: craft spirits.

A Colorado brewery has discontinued a beer named for former Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper after an anti-fracking group threatened a boycott.

The Daily Camera reports The Post Brewing Co. said in a statement Tuesday it would stop production and sales of the Hickenlooper American Ale.

Brewtography Project

The closest that Travis Rupp came to getting fired, he says, was the time he tried to make chicha. The recipe for the Peruvian corn-based beer, cobbled together from bits of pre-Incan archaeological evidence, called for chewed corn partially fermented in spit. So, Rupp’s first task had been to convince his colleagues to gather round a bucket and offer up their chompers for the cause.

CERIA labels
Matt Bloom / KUNC

Inside a Denver bottling plant, Keith Villa watches as rows and rows of 10-ounce silver bottles whisk by, all filled with a golden-colored Belgian-style ale called Grainwave.

It looks and tastes like beer. But instead of alcohol, there's 5 milligrams of THC mixed inside. That's the psychoactive compound in marijuana that gets you high.

If the impasse over President Trump’s proposed border wall makes it to Saturday morning, this will be the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. And it has an unlikely victim — craft beer.

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