Denver

Stacy Nick / KUNC

The Front Range is in the middle of a music boom right now with a number of new music venues popping up – and on the horizon.

The latest announcement of a new 750-seat venue in Fort Collins has some wondering if audiences will be able to support all of them.

“I know a lot of people are willing to, you know, buy a decent priced ticket for Red Rocks or something and then make the drive down there,” said Angel Kwiatkowski, founder of Cohere Bandwidth, an organization that provides rehearsal space and support to local bands. “I’m wondering if us having a bigger venue will put a dent in the Denver music scene – so people will stay up here.”

There are a lot of new venues that think they will.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

The Front Range's booming economy is good news for many. Yet fast growth has caused a housing crunch from Denver to Fort Collins.

Rising rents and home prices are squeezing a vulnerable population: seniors. Groups that work to help lower-income older adults say they are having a harder time placing seniors in subsidized housing and also starting to see more of this population lacking a place to call home.

Courtesy of Cirque de la Symphonie

Some days, don't you just want to run away with the circus? Well, it looks like the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra is doing exactly that. If contortionists aren’t your thing, maybe running away with (or more likely from) some blood-thirsty zombies would be more fun…

Colorado General Assembly

Health insurance premiums can vary widely in Colorado depending on where you live — it's just one of the factors health insurance companies use to calculate prices. Mountain regions continue to have some of the highest premiums in the country. At the statehouse, House Bill 16-1336 [.pdf] would look at treating the entire state as one region, rather than continuing to group regions separately.

"Our current insurance payment of $1,508 a month is equivalent to our mortgage payment. We can't afford it," said Richard Backe, a Garfield County small-business owner. "There are numerous people in the mountain district with the same story. We are the healthiest counties in the state, and we have the highest insurance rates."

Jim Hill / KUNC

State lawmakers are set to debate the annual budget, which funds everything from roads and schools, to health care and parks. In 2016, Colorado has a shortfall, so that means making budget cuts. So what are some of the major budget issues? We asked the reporters working the hallways of the capitol to find out.

Colorado General Assembly

Update 5.13.2016: Gov. John Hickenlooper has signed legislation finally legalizing rain barrels. Our original story continues below.

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A bill that would allow people to collect rain that falls from their rooftops is hung up in the Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee, after the chair said he wasn't comfortable with the measure. It's not clear when the committee will vote on it.

The same thing happened during the 2015 legislative session when the rain barrel bill vote was delayed. While the bill eventually cleared the committee over the objections of the Republican chair, it failed on the final day of the session when time ran out.

"I didn't plan on today being Groundhog Day, I anticipated that the bill would pass," said state Sen. Michael Merrifield (D-Colorado Springs), sponsor of House Bill 16-1005 [.pdf].

Arne Svenson / Courtesy the artist and Julie Saul Gallery, New York

Peek-a-boo, Arne Svenson's camera sees you. From a voyeuristic photo exhibition to a sleepover at one of Colorado's oldest venues to a Beatles reunion – of sorts – this week is pretty packed with options.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

Colorado's next lieutenant governor is poised to be a top executive from Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Gov. John Hickenlooper nominated Donna Lynne, an executive vice president at Kaiser, saying she would be very capable filling his shoes if he doesn't end up finishing his second term. Hickenlooper has long been rumored as a possible cabinet pick for a Democratic President.

"If I were offered something in Washington I would certainly look at it, but especially right now, I could not be happier to be the governor of Colorado," Hickenlooper said.

Paul Sableman / Flickr - Creative Commons

Every bill at the Colorado legislature must receive a fair hearing… and a vote. That's what state law says, but the fate of many bills is decided before lawmakers even begin the debate. Their fate is sealed in what's called a kill committee.

Colorado Senate GOP / Flickr - Creative Commons

Several police reform measures are making their way through the statehouse, and lawmakers are also looking at how best to address the problem of teenagers sexting. We asked two reporters working under the gold dome to review the week that was.

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