food

Shoppers are willing to pay a premium for ingredients that are cage-free, organic or wild caught. But how do you really know if the chicken you are eating spent its life happily pecking for corn or if your blackberries were grown locally and are pesticide free?

Simple. Put a tracking device on it.

By now, you've likely heard the argument to eat less meat for the health of the planet. Heck, even Beyoncé has been pushing this message, dangling the prospect of free concert tickets for life before fans to raise interest in plant-based eating for the environment.

The biggest, most valuable new technology on Midwestern farms these days is a new family of soybean seeds. But some farmers say they're buying these seeds partly out of fear.

A new lawsuit claims that the company Monsanto, now owned by Bayer, violated antitrust laws when it introduced the seeds. Bayer is asking the court to dismiss the complaint.

A granola bar enthusiast walks into a grocery store, scouting for a healthy treat. The first shelf is lined with KIND Bars, with wrappers flaunting things like "five super grains" and zero genetically engineered ingredients. Below sit boxes of Quaker Chewy bars, 100-calorie oat snacks spotted with marshmallows and chocolate chips. Finally, there's Annie's Homegrown granola bars, gluten-free and "made with goodness."

People who most intensely oppose genetically modified food think they know a lot about food science, but actually know the least, according to a peer-reviewed paper published in January in the journal Nature Human Behaviour.

GMOs are widely considered safe by scientists, but opponents have said they want more science on the potential harm so that subjective arguments aren’t part of the equation.

Redwan Farooq / Mosa Meat

Missouri has already made it a crime to label something like a veggie burger or tissue grown in a lab as “meat.” Now, other states are considering doing the same.

Wyoming legislators are scheduled to discuss a bill this week that would prohibit the word “meat” from appearing on a package that does not contain edible parts of what was previously a live animal.  

Farming insects may be more sustainable than raising meat, but so far that hasn't been quite enough to convince most Westerners to eat them.

Marketing them as delicious, exquisite delicacies, though? That might do the trick.

The global demand for meat drives environmental decline, from forest depletion and soil erosion to increased water use and the release of greenhouse gases.

Matt Bloom

Ten years ago, Bill Conkling worked in quality assurance at Anheuser Busch where he tested batches of beer for a living. Now, he crushes Colorado-grown grapes into more than 12,000 bottles of wine each year.

In 2007 he saw an opportunity to produce wine in Northern Colorado, so he started Ten Bears Winery in Laporte during his spare time. After 8 years of promoting his wine at farmers markets and festivals, he grew the business into his full-time job.