Greeley Water

Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr-Creative Commons

As Colorado plans for a future with more people and less water, some in the world of water are turning to the problem of lawns.

In the 2014 legislative session, state senator Ellen Roberts (R-Durango) introduced a bill [.pdf] that would limit lawns in new developments if they took water from farms.  Although the bill was changed dramatically before it passed, that proposal opened up a statewide conservation about how water from agriculture and the Western Slope is used – particularly when it is growing Front Range grass.

Robert S. Donovan / Creative Commons

Plentiful mountain snowpack means little to no mandatory watering restrictions across Northern Colorado and Denver for the 2014 summer.

Nathan Heffel / KUNC

Despite September’s historic rains and flooding in Northern Colorado the restoration work continues in the watersheds heavily damaged by 2012’s High Park Fire.

Thirsty Cities Drain Colorado Farm Land

Apr 4, 2013
Farmer Kent Peppler
Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Farmers throughout the Great Plains are preparing for what could be a tough growing season. They’re in a tight spot with irrigation water, due to the region’s persistent drought.

During a visit to the Greeley Bellvue Water Treatment Plant, Colorado Democratic Senator Michael Bennet urged the US House of Representatives to fund $120 million for Emergency Watershed Protection. 

Brad Holt / CreativeCommons/Flickr

When you think about Thanksgiving, you might envision a turkey dinner, or spending time with your family. However, do you ever think about water conservation?

Muhammad Mahdi Karim / Wikimedia Commons

Following a summer of wildfires and drought, Greeley city officials asked homeowners to voluntarily stop watering their lawns Oct. 1, two weeks earlier than normal, to conserve water for next year. In just two weeks, residents saved roughly 96 million gallons of water, or enough to supply 640 homes for a year.

Andrew pmk / Wikimedia Commons

The City of Greeley is asking water customers to voluntarily stop watering their lawns by Oct. 1. That’s two weeks before the typical recommendation to stop regular lawn watering.

USDA-Creative Commons

It’s been ten years since the Hayman fire, and Denver water officials are still dealing with the fire’s impact to its water supply. In Northern Colorado, water managers are just beginning to assess the damage to their complex system of reservoirs and holding ponds following this summer’s wildfires.