Gun Regulation

Democratic presidential hopefuls called for increased firearms restrictions at a forum organized by gun control advocates in Las Vegas Wednesday.

The group largely agreed on measures like reinstating the so-called assault weapons ban and universal background checks, though some called for gun buybacks.Others cautioned against going too far and endangering more politically feasible changes.

A recent survey from APM Research Lab, Call To Mind and Guns & America found that most Americans — including those who own guns and those who don’t — support laws requiring gun owners to store their firearms with a lock in place.

But not everyone sees storage the same way.

UPDATE 10:30 a.m ET, 10/7/2019: The Supreme Court announced on Oct. 7 that it will hear arguments in the case challenging New York City’s repealed gun restrictions. They will also consider whether the case should be dismissed because the law’s been repealed during arguments scheduled for Dec. 2.

Dave Hardy, an attorney in private practice in Arizona, thinks this is the term when the Supreme Court finally decides whether a constitutional right to carry a firearm extends beyond the front door.

Following the shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, Congress is considering a bill that would encourage states to pass red flag laws. Members of Congress may want to study Florida, where it's been in place for a year and a half.

Since it was adopted there, courts have approved some 2,500 risk protection orders. That's nearly five every day, more than any other state. The Florida law allows police, acting with court approval, to temporarily seize weapons from people deemed to be at risk of harming themselves or others.

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Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET

On the presidential campaign trail in Iowa and on the op-ed page of The New York Times, former Vice President Joe Biden has made the case for going back to a nationwide ban on assault weapons and making it "even stronger."

Some have reacted with quizzical expressions: "Back?" "Stronger?"

Luis Melgar / Guns & America

Polling shows guns are among the top priorities for many Democratic voters and gun issues remain a big topic in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

The candidates spent precious minutes talking about their gun-related proposals during the first round of debates. Gun control groups spent big — and won big — in the 2018 midterms, including in a few key races that helped Democrats retake control of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Gun policy is back on the democratic debate stage in a way it hasn’t been in decades. But are the candidates’ proposals likely to save lives?

Daniel Webster directs the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, and he’s happy that for once, these issues are getting some campaign attention. But he’s also really hoping voters demand proposals based on evidence.

Large-capacity magazines, containers that hold more than 15 rounds of ammunition, have been illegal in Colorado since 2013. Lawmakers passed the ban following the 2012 mass shooting at a movie theater in Aurora.

A federal court has ruled that the last man in America to legally own a bump stock must hand it over to the government.

docmonstereyes / CC BY 2.0

Colorado's highest court is set to decide whether a law banning gun magazines that hold more than 15 rounds violates a person's state constitutional right to bear arms.

The Denver Post reports that the Colorado Supreme Court announced Monday that it would hear the case, which stems from a 2016 lawsuit by Rocky Mountain Gun Owners and other gun rights advocates challenging the law.

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