Guns & America | KUNC

Guns & America

Guns & America is a groundbreaking national reporting collaborative in which 10 public media newsrooms train their attention on a singular issue: the role of guns in American life.

Over the course of two years, the 10 stations, representing a diverse range of communities all over the country, will report on how guns impact us as Americans, from the cultural significance of hunting and sport shooting, to the role guns play in suicide, homicide, mass shootings and beyond.

Operating across broadcast and online platforms, the Guns & America team will approach the topic of guns with nuance, accuracy, imagination, and innovative cross-platform storytelling. Expect to see our reporting online and to hear memorable stories on a public radio station near you.

The 10 public media stations participating in Guns & America:

  • WAMU - Washington, D.C.
  • WNPR - Hartford, Connecticut
  • WUNC - Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  • WABE - Atlanta
  • ideastream - Cleveland
  • KCUR - Kansas City, Missouri
  • KERA - Dallas
  • KUNC - Greeley, Colorado
  • Boise State Public Radio - Boise, Idaho
  • OPB - Portland, Oregon

The reporter for Guns & America at KUNC is Leigh Paterson.

Dee Smith didn’t know De’Von Bailey. But he knows Bailey’s family, and says he was angry when he heard that the 19-year-old had been killed by Colorado Springs police this summer.

Now, standing by the memorial and the stained asphalt on the quiet corner where it happened, Smith is speechless.

“[Because] then you just imagine that it could be me, it could be my nephews, somebody else, friends that I know that’s from the neighborhood,” Smith said. “Just the fact that it’s from here. I was born and raised out here. It has a little different meaning for me.”

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The holiday shopping season is big business for most retailers in the United States, and the gun industry is no exception. The last three months of the year represent almost a third of annual sales for firearms retailers each year.

Firearms manufacturers had a good year in 2018, according to a new report from the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF.) The industry’s main trade group says that’s in part because gun owners are concerned about increased gun regulation.

American producers pumped out nearly 7,660,772 firearms and roughly 8.1 billion rounds rounds of ammunition in 2018, according to data compiled by NSSF from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Alcohol Misuse And Gun Violence: What We Know

Dec 17, 2019

While the relationship between gun violence and mental health get lots of attention, numerous studies have established a much stronger link between excessive alcohol consumption and gun violence.

Josh’s girlfriend broke up with him in the fall of 2017, and it hit him hard. He became depressed, started drinking and became more withdrawn. He got into a few mountain biking accidents, which his mom, Diane, thought were intentional. She thought he was trying to hurt himself.

“And then it just seemed like all of a sudden he spiraled down bad,” Diane said.

Saturday marked seven years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting that left 20 students and six educators dead. And, as a town came together to remember and to pray in the morning, it also came together to celebrate an unlikely football victory by night’s end.

Back in the early 1990s, there was Operation Triggerlock. A few years later, in Richmond, Virginia, they called the policy Project Exile. Now it’s called Project Safe Neighborhoods.

Through three decades of debate about gun control and how to prevent violent crime, policymakers of both parties have consistently agreed to crack down on people with criminal records who are caught possessing a firearm. Charges that typically would go to state court are moved over to the federal system, where sentences are longer and prisoners can be sent far from home.

After a much-anticipated showdown over gun regulations at the U.S. Supreme Court in early December focused on procedure over substance, advocates on all sides are waiting to see if the court dismisses the case.

The city council of Aspen, Colorado, voted unanimously in late October to ban the public from openly carrying guns in government buildings.

A crowd of opponents to the measure attended the council meeting, many with guns in holsters on their hips. Over nearly two hours of public comment, opponents said designating city hall a so-called gun-free zone is dangerous. Many suggested that armed private citizens could help in an active shooter situation.

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