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At a public hearing last year in Boise, Idaho, recent transplant Alicia Peterson urged lawmakers not to tighten vaccine requirements. 

"I, this last year, ripped my whole family from the only home I've ever known, which was California, for these very reasons," Peterson said. "I left for health freedom."

According to the Idaho Statesman, Peterson isn't alone. An investigation by the newspaper found about two dozen others who said "they moved to Idaho because of the state's limited regulation—specifically, the ease of getting a vaccine exemption for schoolchildren."

Rae Ellen Bichell / Mountain West News Bureau

This post was updated at 8:30 p.m. with additional information.

About 60 people gathered at the Colorado Capitol Monday for the third and final day of a summit on vaccination. It featured a series of presentations full of reasons why people should not get their children immunized.

Michele Ames says that's a problem.

"The world consensus is that vaccines are safe and effective and they save lives. Period," said Ames, a spokesperson for Colorado Vaccinates, a coalition of groups including Children's Hospital Colorado and the local chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics aimed at increasing vaccination rates in the state.

There's a new question that anti-hunger advocates want doctors and nurses to ask patients: Do you have enough food?

Public health officials say the answer often is "not really." So clinics and hospitals have begun stocking their own food pantries in recent years.

One of the latest additions is Connectus Health, a federally funded clinic in Nashville, Tenn. This month, the rear of LaShika Taylor's office transformed into a community cupboard.

Oil and gas
Matt Bloom / KUNC

Colorado’s oil and gas regulators say they will start putting some drilling applications through a more rigorous review process after a study found people face short term health risks, such as headaches and dizziness, if they are within 2,000 feet of the wells.

The study released Thursday specifically found the health risks occur when a well is being constructed, with the highest risk coming at a time when a process called “flowback” occurs.

Bennett, Tamura-Wicks et. al. 2019 / https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002856

A pair of scientific reports out this week looked at air pollution and how it’s changed in recent years. The Mountain West looks clean compared to other parts of the country, at first glance.

James Brody and Brittany Bonner
Stacy Nick / KUNC

College athletes have coaches, trainers and physical therapists who place a lot of focus on keeping them physically fit and help them recover from injuries. At the University of Colorado - Boulder, there's a similar program for musicians.

"It's something that a lot of people in the general population don't really quite understand about musicians — that we do things that are athletic in nature," said James Brody, director of CU's Musicians' Wellness program.

You may not be thin-skinned, but your eyelids certainly are. The fragile tissue is the thinnest on the body, less than 1 millimeter thick.

While crepe-thin skin is great for blinking, it makes the area especially vulnerable to the sun's UV rays. Five to 10 percent of skin cancers occur on the eyelid.

Colorado ranked 27th in the nation for services provided to residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities, known collectively as IDD.

The Case for Inclusion 2019 ranks states on policies and programs that provide support to help individuals with IDD lead more independent and productive lives. The report, compiled by the ANCOR Foundation and United Cerebral Palsy, scored states on five factors including promoting independence and keeping families together.

Joe Adams / Flickr

Representatives of state outdoor recreation offices gathered in Denver Wednesday to sign something called the Confluence Accords.

The eight states include Colorado, Utah, Montana and Wyoming.

Idaho officially joined Utah today as the third state to try to expand Medicaid by ballot initiative.

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