Hunting

Jay Gannett / CC BY-SA 2.0

Colorado wildlife commissioners have rejected a citizen petition to outlaw the trapping and trophy hunting of bobcats.

The Denver Post reported Thursday that the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission heard arguments from both sides during a hearing in Grand Junction Thursday.

If you kill a wolf in Idaho, your effort might be worth $1,000. 

A nonprofit in North Idaho covers costs for hunters and trappers who successfully harvest wolves. The group, called the Foundation for Wildlife Management pays up to $1,000 per wolf harvest.

 


Mule deer
Ryan Moehring / USFWS

Hunters in Colorado are being advised to be on the lookout for a contagious disease that kills deer.

The Daily Camera reports chronic wasting disease has now spread to 24 states, including Colorado.

And, while it has yet to happen, there is some concern it could spread to humans who hunt and eat the meat.

Colorado Wildlife Council

You might have seen the Hug-a-Hunter or Hug-an-Angler ads on TV or social media over the past year. Through both messaging and humor, the campaign aims to highlight that hunters and anglers contribute to conservation. One ad starts by explaining that when someone buys a hunting license, some of that money goes to conservation, like restoring forests and protecting wildlife.

A federal judge has extended a temporary ban on grizzly bear hunting near Yellowstone National Park while he mulls the animal’s fate.

 


A U.S. district court hearing Thursday could decide the fate of grizzly bears living around Yellowstone National Park.

Michael Seraphim / Colorado Parks & Wildlife

Bears, some of them with young cubs, are starting to emerge from hibernation along Colorado’s Rocky Mountains. As they do, there’s a risk they will be killed or have to be euthanized -- something that’s been happening more frequently.

According to the most recent data provided to KUNC, 2,484 bears were killed between 2011 and 2015 by means other than licensed hunting. That’s almost a 75 percent increase over the previous five-year period.

Anita Martinez, Colorado Parks and Wildlife / Division of Wildlife

Colorado could be the next state to allow hunters to wear florescent pink. A Democratic proposal to give hunters the option of wearing pink – in addition to the traditional safety orange – has passed the Republican controlled Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources and Energy Committee.

"I hunt because it's a treasured time with my dad and my brothers," said Senator Kerry Donovan (D-Vail), a big game hunter and sponsor of Senate Bill 68 [.pdf]. "And the stories that happen in hunting camp are the stories that my family tell over and over again."

Joe Lewandowski / Colorado Parks and Wildlife

For the first time, pronghorn hunting will be allowed in the Soapstone Prairie Natural Area north of Fort Collins. Six doe pronghorn permits will be offered by lottery until the end of February. Officials estimate there are over 3,000 pronghorn in the area.

“It’s indicative of a pronghorn population that’s quite a bit over what they [Colorado Department of Wildlife] would like to see in that area, so they are trying to find ways to reduce the pronghorn herd,” said Red Mountain District Manager Travis Rollins. “They have been getting a lot of complains from ranchers and local farmers in that area with crop damage and a variety of things.”

Paul Sableman / Flickr - Creative Commons

Lawmakers have introduced the first wave of bills as part of the annual legislative session. To learn what's in store, we asked reporters who work daily under the dome at the capitol.

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