Immigration | KUNC

Immigration

Courtesy Glenn Spencer

Contractors continue to install new border barriers across the U.S.-Mexico border, including many across sensitive lands, including Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge and Cabeza Prieta National Monument.

In January, hundreds of people gathered on a small bridge spanning the San Pedro River to protest the pending construction of a border barrier across the riverbed.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

COVID-19 is closing down meatpacking facilities across the country. At least 15 plants in nine states have either closed or reduced hours in response to outbreaks.

Workers at these plants tend to be among the most vulnerable: refugees and first-generation immigrants. Government officials have deemed them essential, but some say they're not being treated that way.

Courtesy Maytham Alshadood

Tens of thousands of Iraqis and Afghans did critical, life-threatening work for the United States during wartime. In return, the U.S. offers citizenship to those workers who risked retaliation from insurgents or the Taliban. Yet the number of Afghans and Iraqis getting in the country has declined sharply since Donald Trump became president.

Maytham Alshadood, a combat interpreter from Iraq who is now a citizen in Colorado, worries for those still waiting.

Hundreds of tech workers pack an auditorium for a recent networking event in Toronto. The evening's host glides around the room on a hoverboard, equal parts game show host and techie.

"Who here is new to Canada?" asks Jason Goldlist, the co-founder of TechToronto, an organization that helps newcomers navigate the city's fast-growing tech ecosystem.

Dec. 30 is the deadline to submit a comment to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services over a proposed fee hike to access some records, some of which date back more than 100 years and are useful to genealogists.

The USCIS wants to increase the fee for obtaining immigration files by 500%, which means some people would have to pay more than $600 for the documents. The move would affect families of the millions of people who immigrated to the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Esther Honig / KUNC

Inside a small mobile home in rural Colorado, dark brown curtains are pulled tightly across the windows, locking out light from outside.

A woman who we'll call "A" lives here with her husband and three young children. We're not using her real name to protect her identity, because "A" is originally from Guatemala and undocumented. Like many people in her position, she fears an encounter with immigration officials could force her and her family to return to the country they fled nearly two years ago.

When José moved his family to the United States from Mexico nearly two decades ago, he had hopes of giving his children a better life.

Phil Weiser
Amanda Schwengel / MSU Denver

The U.S. Supreme Court is dealing with a case that could affect the fate of more than 700,000 young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Colorado is one of a handful of states that are part of a federal lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's decision two years ago to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program.

Earlier this year, the State Department quietly rolled out new limits on one of President Trump's favorite targets: the diversity visa lottery.

The White House made ending the program one of the "pillars" of its immigration policy proposal last year. But those proposals went nowhere on Capitol Hill.

So the administration tried something different: It is restricting who can apply for the diversity visa, in a way that advocates say will make it much harder for low-income immigrants to apply.

Updated 6 p.m. ET

Immigrant advocates asked a federal appeals court on Tuesday to block the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), a key part of President Trump's immigration policy. The policy forces asylum seekers to wait for their immigration court hearings in Mexico.

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