Latinos

Determined not to be excluded from the post-election bipartisan talk of passing immigration legislation, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on Wednesday rejected two Republican proposals while outlining its own priorities.

If the election results were disappointing for Republicans nationally, they were devastating for the GOP in California.

Nathan Heffel / KUNC

Polls showed a massive Latino turnout on election day. Activists are hoping the voting bloc will now play a key role in shaping issues surrounding comprehensive immigration reform.

Paging Jeb Bush.

Your party needs you.

In the aftermath of Tuesday's election losses, Republicans have been scrambling to formulate a fix for what went wrong.

A big part of that calculation involves repairing relations with Hispanics, the fast-growing electoral power base that rejected Republican Mitt Romney's "self deportation" immigration solution and voted for President Obama in numbers that exceeded 70 percent.

Maybe I've got too many election results on my brain.

But the Pew Research Center's report about how people are using their mobile phones to get health information sent me to the data from the exit polls. Really.

Why?

The bottom line of the Pew report is that cellphone "owners who are Latino, African American, between the ages of 18-49, or hold a college degree are also more likely to gather health information" than other people on their mobile phones.

VoxEfx / Flickr - Creative Commons

It’s estimated that 24 million Latinos in America were eligible to vote in Tuesday's election – and early polls show they overwhelmingly supported President Obama’s re-election nationally and here in Colorado. 

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Maryland Dream Act, which allows undocumented students to pay in-state tuition, will stand.

With a 58 to 42 split, voters rejected a measure that sought to overturn legislation passed by lawmakers last year.

Inside Higher Ed reports:

Kirk Siegler / KUNC

Exit polling in Colorado and other western states indicates that President Obama handily won the Latino vote in Tuesday’s election. 

The final days of an election cycle bring an obsession with the short term — the very short term. Daily tracking polls. A relentless get-it, post-it, blog-it news cycle. Trending topics on Twitter telling us something (though it's not always clear what).

But for just a moment, let's slow it down, look at what's happening over a somewhat longer time frame, and see what it tells us about what the country will look like for the winner of the presidential race.

The Long View

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