LGBT

It's been twenty years since the brutal murder of Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyoming. One legacy of his hate-motivated death is the wide collection of artistic responses.

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The U.S. State Department is considering whether to appeal a ruling regarding how the agency asks for a person's gender on a passport application.

On Sept. 19 a federal district judge in Colorado ruled in favor of Fort Collins resident Dana Zzyym. Zzyym, who is intersex, was denied a passport in 2015 because they did not mark male or female on the application.

Jeffrey Beall / Wikimedia Commons

The Colorado baker who wouldn't make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple and won a ruling at the U.S. Supreme Court is suing the state over another discrimination allegation.

Jeffrey Beall / Wikimedia Commons

In the summer of 2012, fiancés David Mullins and Charlie Craig tried to order a wedding cake from a shop in a Denver suburb. The owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop refused to serve the same-sex couple because of his Christian beliefs. Now, the Supreme Court has sided with the baker, but not for the reason you might expect.

Stephen Melkisethian via Flickr Creative Commons

On a Sunday night in D.C., eager spectators braved the cold to get in line early for a potential seat inside the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Come Tuesday Dec. 5, the court would hear arguments in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, a case first amendment experts say has the potential to sap the strength of anti-discrimination laws. Colorado and 18 other states have granted some form of legal protection for sexual minorities. 

It all began in 2012, when two men walked into a local bakery in search of a wedding cake. 

Martin Falbisoner / Wikimedia Commons

The future of health care and the politics of gender have been front and center in the national headlines this week. Colorado’s congressional delegation -- made up of the representatives and senators elected to office -- have been part of the action. Here’s a round-up of the votes, reactions and statements from your Colorado representatives.

Before this month's shooting in Orlando, the deadliest attack on gay people in the U.S. happened at the UpStairs Lounge, a gay bar in New Orleans. On this date in 1973, someone set fire to that bar in the French Quarter, killing 32 people.

No one was ever charged with the arson. And though it remains the deadliest fire in the city's history, neither the mayor nor the governor spoke about it then.

courtesy of Mary Celeste

In the early 1990s, Colorado had a new nickname - the “hate state.” The state was missing out on millions of dollars from a boycott from across of the country, and Evangelical Christian groups were flocking to Colorado Springs.

Why? Because of a new amendment to the state constitution that made it legal to discriminate against LGBT people.

Andy Goodling met his boyfriend, Bryan, at college in Pennsylvania. Six years ago, they started dating — but for years, they kept their relationship hidden.

"Bryan was my best friend, but we were both very much in the closet," Goodling tells his father, Scott, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. "You know, we knew who we were. We just didn't want to actually say it."

Pocatello, Idaho, and Laramie, Wyo., might not be the first places you think of leading the charge to protect the LGBT community from discrimination. But in these rural, Republican-led states, local governments are taking the matter into their own hands.

Twenty-year-old college student CylieAnn Erickson was in the room when the city council in Laramie passed its LGBT anti-discrimination bill earlier this year. She says that when the final vote was counted, she breathed a sigh of relief.

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