LGBTQ

As the sun dips below the horizon, the colored lights turn on — bathing the Navajo Nation Council Chambers in rainbow hues as the crowd cheers.

On June 28, the Navajo Nation kicked off Diné Pride, a two-day event in Window Rock, Ariz., the capital of the Navajo reservation.

Courtesy of The Center on Colfax

One of the country’s largest Pride parades will wind through the streets of Denver this weekend. The grand marshall is the first openly gay governor in United States history. For many, it’s seen as a symbol of hard-won tolerance for LGBTQ residents in what used to be known as the hate state.

 

Last month, on the steps of the Capitol building, Gov. Jared Polis addressed a cheerful crowd of LGBTQ rights advocates, many waving rainbow flags.

Fifty years ago this month, police raided a gay bar in New York City called the Stonewall Inn.

It was a common occurrence at the time, but on this night, patrons – trans women of color, lesbians, drag queens and gay men – said "enough." The raid ignited six days of protests and became known as the Stonewall Riots – largely credited with sparking the modern gay rights movement.

Flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Jared Polis signed a pair of bills expanding state protections to the LGBTQ community into law on Friday, the eve of Pride Month.

The bills included a ban on psychotherapy that seeks to change the sexual orientation or gender identity of minors, often called “conversion therapy,” and a change to state law that makes it easier for transgender residents to update gender markers on their birth certificates.

Polis called it an exciting day for Colorado.

Updated 11:13 p.m. 4/26/19

The judiciary body of the United Methodist Church ruled Friday against LGBTQ clergy members and same-sex marriage in the church, upholding key parts of an earlier decision.

Peter Nunn is 32 and he's happy. He lives just outside Atlanta with his husband Monte, his dog Amelie, and their cat Hollow.

The dining room is decorated with a photo gallery wall of family — his husband dancing with his mother at their wedding and pictures of the couple. But it took a long time and work to get to a place where Nunn said he accepted and loved himself.

As a gay man, Nunn said, his father tried to change him.

The Supreme Court has accepted three cases that ask whether federal anti-discrimination laws should apply to sexual orientation and gender identity in the workplace, putting the court on track to consider high-profile LGBTQ issues after its next term begins this fall.

The recent news that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints would now allow children of LGBTQ people to be blessed and baptised came right on time for the growing family of Kevin Kolditz.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced on Thursday that it was reversing its controversial 2015 policy that classified people in same-sex marriages as "apostates." The church, widely known as the Mormon church, had also barred the children of such marriages from blessing or baptism until age 18.

Quinn Robinson is only 18 years old, but she has already learned some hard lessons about the world. "It's scary being a trans person because I know there are people out there who just hate me for being myself," she says. "There's been kids who have approached me and say, 'Hey, you should burn in hell.' "

Robinson is a high school senior in Allendale, Mich., a small but growing town about 30 minutes outside Grand Rapids and smack dab in the middle of what's known as the state's "Bible Belt." Drive off the main road and you quickly find yourself in farm country.

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