Medicaid

Next Steps For Colorado And The Affordable Care Act

Apr 3, 2014
Jim Hill / KUNC

Like other states that opted to run their own exchange, Colorado spent several years and hundreds of millions in federal dollars to create an insurance marketplace specifically tailored for Coloradans.

Behaving well in elementary school could reduce smoking in later life. At least, that's what Trillium Community Health Plan hopes, and it's putting money behind the idea.

Danebo Elementary in Eugene, Ore., is one of 50 schools receiving money to teach classes while integrating something called the "Good Behavior Game." Teacher Cami Railey sits at a small table, surrounded by four kids. She's about to teach them the "s" sound and the "a" sound. But first, as she does every day, she goes over the rules.

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Almost half a million Coloradans are expected to gain dental benefits under Medicaid by 2016. That doesn’t mean they’ll be able to see a dentist.

If you want to meet somebody who's really happy with the Affordable Care Act, then say hello to Sue Birch, Colorado's Medicaid director.

Nearly 40,000 Coloradans signed up for health coverage on the state's new marketplace, Connect for Health Colorado, rather than HealthCare.gov.

Photo by Kirk Siegler

The board of Colorado’s health exchange is pushing for an overhaul to speed up lengthy Medicaid and insurance applications.

spacebahr / Flickr - Creative Commons

Black Coloradans see the doctor less frequently, get less preventive care and report being in worse health than other residents of the state according to a recent health survey.

President Obama on Tuesday appointed one of his top management gurus, Jeffrey Zeints, to head the team working to fix what ails HealthCare.gov, the troubled website that's supposed to allow residents of 36 states to enroll in coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

Have you heard about the young invincibles? That's the name given to young people who think nothing bad can happen to them.

Enrollment of healthy people like them in insurance under the Affordable Care Act is key to offsetting the costs of older, less healthy buyers.

In Pennsylvania, more than a half-million people who don't have insurance are waiting to hear whether the state will take advantage of a Medicaid expansion that's part of the Affordable Care Act.

The federal law would allow people earning up to 138 percent of federal poverty guidelines to sign up for Medicaid. But a Supreme Court ruling that largely upheld the law gave states the choice whether to expand their Medicaid programs.

Starting in January, it will get a lot easier for millions of people across to the country to qualify for Medicaid.

Adults making up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level ($15,856 in 2013) will be able to sign up for Medicaid, under an expansion paid for entirely by the federal government between 2014 and 2017.

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