National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Bradley Cheetham was about to deliver his fourth or fifth presentation in one month. He’d given so many, he said, he’d nearly lost track.

Pacing back and forth in the hallway outside the Colorado School of Mines classroom, where a crowd of space industry bigwigs awaited him, he shared a few words about life as an entrepreneur.

“Honestly, entrepreneurship is a really hard job,” he said, laughing. “Space is a really hard job. Doing them together does not make either easier.”

Courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Bet you never thought about Mozart and methane going together, did you? One music festival is doing just that: combining classical music and climate science.

It might seem a little strange to some, but that’s kind of the idea, said Jephta Bernstein, executive artistic director for Off the Hook Arts. The Fort Collins music education program is using the theme Mission Earth for its SummerFest 2018 series.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

A new study from NASA reinforces the idea that droughts are getting worse and could become more frequent in the Western U.S.

The culprit is human-caused climate change.

CU Boulder

In 1977, NASA launched two space probes to explore deep space and expand our view of the solar system. 40 years later, Voyager 1 and 2 are still sending back images to the amazement of scientists -- including University of Colorado Boulder’s Fran Bagenal. She’s a professor at CU Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, and

“It was completely nuts to see these new worlds for the first time,” says Bagenal. “And each time these new images would come up on the camera and you’d be going, ‘What are we seeing now?’”

NASA

The 2017 NASA astronaut candidate class was picked over a two-year period from 18,300 applicants. Four of the chosen 12 have direct connections to Colorado. Jessica Watkins and Matthew Dominick were born and raised in Lafayette and Wheat Ridge, respectively. Dr. Frank Rubio currently serves as a surgeon in Fort Carson and Robb Kulin attended the University of Denver.

KUNC recently interviewed Kulin as he prepares for two years of astronaut training.

NASA

Since it established its orbit in 2004, Cassini has continued to thrill scientists -- and the public -- with images and data  of Saturn’s rings and atmosphere. One of the excited scientists is University of Colorado Boulder’s Larry Esposito.

Enlighten Yourself On The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Jan 18, 2017
S. Habbal, M. Druckmüller and P. Aniol / NASA

The last time a total solar eclipse was visible to most of the continental U.S., Richard Nixon was president and the Beatles had just released ‘Let It Be’ in the U.K. The 2017 total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 follows a long tradition of captivating people’s imaginations that’s been going on for thousands of years.

Oral and written histories tell us of fear and trepidation at the sight of a comet or meteor, while other cultures celebrated the same sight with dancing and feasts. But the disappearance of the sun or the moon -- an eclipse -- was an exceptional event.

H.A. Weaver et al / published in Science.

Standing in a hallway decorated with images of planets and other space objects, John Spencer is looking at a high resolution photo of Pluto hanging in front of him. It’s striking, a mostly gray sphere with dark maroon and golden hues. Spencer, a planetary scientist with the Southwest Research Institute’s who works out of their Boulder office, points out features.

"The North Pole is up here. This area up here is a vast plain of frozen nitrogen."

It’s hard to believe, but until July 2015, scientists like Spencer had almost no idea what Pluto looked like. That’s when the New Horizons spacecraft zoomed by the dwarf planet, capturing images and data that led to a vast reimagining of Pluto. Now, he and others are sharing what they’ve learned.

On Monday, NASA started accepting applications for its new class of astronauts. Applying is simple: Just log in to USAjobs.gov, search for "astronaut," and upload your resume and references. The job description says "Frequent travel may be required."

Climate change isn't just something to worry about here on Earth. New research published today shows that Mars has undergone a dramatic climate shift in the past that has rendered much of the planet inhospitable to life.

About 3.8 billion years ago, Mars was a reasonably pleasant place. It had a thick atmosphere filled with carbon dioxide that kept it warm. Rivers trickled into lakes across its surface. Some researchers think there might even have been an ocean.

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