opioid lawsuit

Purdue Pharma, the maker of the opioid drug OxyContin, has reached a tentative deal worth billions of dollars that would resolve thousands of lawsuits brought by municipal and state governments who sued the company for allegedly helping to fuel the opioid crisis.

The pending settlement likely means Purdue will avoid going to trial in the sprawling and complicated case involving some 2,300 local governments across 23 states.

The recent court ruling that held the pharmaceutical company, Johnson & Johnson, accountable for its role in Oklahoma’s opioid crisis could influence some of the pending lawsuits seeking to hold energy companies accountable for their role in the climate crisis. That includes one case in the Mountain West.

Updated at 7:04 p.m. ET

An Oklahoma judge has ruled that drugmaker Johnson & Johnson helped ignite the state's opioid crisis by deceptively marketing painkillers, and must pay $572 million to the state.

Oklahoma sought $17.5 billion, blaming Johnson & Johnson for fueling the crisis that has claimed the lives of more than 6,000 people in the state.

A new Washington Post investigative report gives an unprecedented look at the opioid crisis — including which companies distributed billions of pills, and where.

Colorado's lawsuit accusing the maker of OxyContin of fueling and profiting from the opioid epidemic has been expanded to include allegations against former Purdue Pharma executives and members the Sackler family who own the company.

Two years ago, the drug company Insys Therapeutics posted a quarter-billion dollars in annual sales. But the Arizona-based firm's fortunes plummeted so far that on Monday its leaders declared bankruptcy. It was the latest fall-out from the nation's prescription opioid epidemic, which has killed more than 200,000 Americans and triggered hundreds of lawsuits against Big Pharma.

Charles Williams / Flickr

Denver and 16 other Colorado communities have sued the manufacturers and distributors of opioids claiming they fraudulently hyped the drugs behind the deadly nationwide epidemic of overdoses.

The Denver Post reports three lawsuits were filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Denver against some of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the country, including OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma Inc.

Matt Bloom / KUNC

Democrat Jared Polis is leading Republican Walker Stapleton in Colorado's governor's race.

A recent bi-partisan poll of likely voters found Polis' seven-point lead is driven by his appeal with unaffiliated and female voters. The poll's margin of error was plus or minus four percentage points.

VIBE 105 / Flickr

[Updated June 12, 2018, 3:25 p.m.] The cities of Lakewood and Wheat Ridge also filed a lawsuit against the nation's largest opioid manufacturers, including Purdue Pharma, Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Cephalon, Johnson & Johnson, Janssen, Endo and Mallinckrodt, in U.S. District Court in Denver on June 8.

The original story continues below.

  

Boulder County and 12 other local governments want to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable for skyrocketing rates of opioid abuse, overdoses and deaths in their communities. According to the Denver Post , they plan to file a lawsuit to force the companies to pay a penalty and change their practices for marketing the drugs.

Marco Verch / Flickr

The city of Alamosa, along with Chaffee, Conejos, Las Animas, Alamosa and Otero counties, filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Denver this week against national pharmaceutical companies - including Purdue Pharma, Inc., Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Johnson & Johnson and Cephalon, Inc.