Protests

A radical environmental movement that originated in the UK is now going international, with several chapters in the Mountain West. 

Amanda Andrews / KUNC

In early September, a photo of four Colorado State University students posing in blackface went viral, setting off an uproar on CSU's campus. This led to questions about First Amendment rights on campus and what the university can and cannot do when it comes to hate speech.

Colorado Edition co-host Henry Zimmerman spoke to KUNC's Amanda Andrews and Stephanie Daniel to get an update on the student response and what the university is doing to protect the rights of the entire CSU community.

Amanda Andrews / KUNC

Students and community leaders gathered for hours in packed student government meeting until early this morning to support a resolution against hate speech.

Students from as far south as Pueblo came to Fort Collins to support the protesters at the meeting after four CSU students posted to social media wearing blackface last week. Protesters filled the room to capacity wearing black and bearing protest signs.

Maggie Mullen / Wyoming Public Radio

Across the country Tuesday, abortion rights advocates gathered at town squares and courthouses to protest recent restrictions to abortion access. Demonstrations also took place here in the Mountain West. In Laramie, that meant standing outside in the snow.

"We're hearty here," said Katy Hartman, who organized the Laramie gathering using the Stop The Bans website. Hartman is a physician and was one of about 25 people that stood with signs in front of the courthouse.

Updated at 4:51 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of students around the world skipped school school Friday to protest inaction on climate change. It was one of the largest turnouts so far in a months long movement that included the U.S. for the first time, in an event organizers call the "U.S. Youth Climate Strike."

Haven Coleman perched on the steps of the Colorado state capitol in a puffy jacket and hat. The 12-year-old looked tiny against the gray stone columns rising up at her back. With her mom standing nearby, she held up a simple sign. On it, she had written the words “School Strike for Climate” in big black magic-markered letters.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Underneath a blue sign reading “I will vote” in bold white print, 17-year-old Carlos “Carlitos” Rodriguez addressed a crowd in Littleton, Colorado about life since a former student shot and killed 17 of his peers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.