Rocky Mountain Arsenal

Courtesy Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant

During World War II, the U.S. military assembled a special group of troops trained to use chemical weapons.

"The big day is still to come," says the narrator of a U.S. War Department training film. "It will be when Hitler, with his back to the wall, frantically uses gas as a last resort."

It was the worst kind of warfare imaginable in the years before the atomic bomb.

Rich Keen / DPRA

Would you live on a former Superfund site? Commerce City is hoping to develop about 1,000 acres of land that was once part of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal. The Denver Business Journal reports the development already has a name that harkens back to its WWII past – Victory Crossing – and will include homes, office space and retail.

But is the arsenal, where more than 600 chemicals including mustard and sarin gasses and later pesticides manufactured and tested for decades, safe for people to live on?

U.S. Senators Cory Gardner (R-Colorado), Michael Bennet (D-Colorado) and U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D-Golden) want to find out. They are among the sponsors of an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act for the 2017 fiscal year that would lift restrictions the Environmental Protection Agency put on the property after the Superfund cleanup was completed in 1996.