Students

Spencer Hall and Melissa Henke
Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

Spencer Hall was about 13 or 14 when his life changed.

"I was at my brother's house," said Hall. "We had the police and social worker knock on my brother's door and tell me that they were taking me into foster care."

Hall bounced around a couple different foster homes before joining the army at 18. Seven years and an associate degree later, he transferred to Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

"I always dreamed, dreamed of being a student at a university," said Hall.

Adriana Guzman
Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

Job interviews can be intimidating, especially when you're a teenager. But Adriana Guzman is prepared for the first question: Tell me a little bit about yourself?

"I'm a junior at Skyline High school," she replied. "I'm also enrolled (at) Front Range Community College where I have 30 credits, college credits."

The 17-year-old is trying to land a client management intern job at IBM in Boulder County. Guzman is meeting with an IBM employee, but the interview is a mock one, taking place at the Innovation Center in Longmont.

Dina Klancir and Ecko Gardner-Huff
Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

High school freshman Ecko Gardner-Huff sits in the school library at Sobesky Academy. She's taking a survey of different career options, checking off the jobs that sound the most interesting.

"Help conduct group therapy sessions? Yes," Gardner-Huff marks it with her pencil. "Take care of children or daycare? Yes. Teach high school classes? No."

Gardner-Huff is working with her school counselor Dina Klancir.

Columbine Memorial
Leigh Paterson / KUNC

For generations, many activists who have called for stricter gun regulations can point to a mass shooting that spurred them to act. Movements sprung from Sandy Hook, the Pulse nightclub shooting, Parkland — and the list continues to grow.

Columbine was no different.

Young Voices Across The Country Lead The Conversation After March For Our Lives

Mar 20, 2019
Tay Anderson
Leigh Paterson / KUNC

In the year since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, young people have brought gun issues to the forefront of our national consciousness like never before.

One year ago, weeks of conversations, walkouts and student action culminated in March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., and across the country.

The sunrise in rural central Michigan reveals a landscape of neatly divided cornfields crossed by ditches and wooded creeks. But few of the sleepy teenagers on the school bus from Maple Valley Junior-Senior High School likely noticed this scene on their hour drive to Grand Rapids.

They set out from their tiny school district of about 1,000 students, heading to the closest big city for a college recruiting fair. About 151 colleges and universities were waiting.

Students
Esther Honig / KUNC

Abdul Ghani Bin Abdul Munaf strolled through the halls of Greeley Central High School on the way to his next class. Ghani, the name he goes by, is 18 and has attended the school since January 2018.

"The school (was) a little big and I was really nervous," he said. "Like I'm a first time. Nobody know me, who I am and where I come from."

Ghani is a Rohingya Muslim. His parents are originally from Burma, also known as Myanmar, and immigrated to Malaysia before he was born.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Underneath a blue sign reading “I will vote” in bold white print, 17-year-old Carlos “Carlitos” Rodriguez addressed a crowd in Littleton, Colorado about life since a former student shot and killed 17 of his peers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.