Technology

Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Brandon Biesemeier climbs up a small ladder into a John Deere sprayer, takes a seat in the enclosed cab, closes the door, and blocks out most of the machine’s loud engine hum. It is a familiar perch to the fourth-generation farmer on Colorado’s eastern plains.

He turns onto a country road, heading south to spray an herbicide on his cornfields, an early growing season task his genetically engineered crops demand if he is to unlock their value. In the cab, a computer screen shows a little pixelated tractor moving across digital fields, logging his work.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

As Kate Moomaw walks amongst the rows of paintings and sculptures in the Denver Art Museum’s collection storage room, you can see that great care has been taken to preserve the works.

According to Kate Moomaw, DAM’s conservationist, there are a lot of tools of the trade: acid-free tissue paper, climate-controlled rooms, eBay.

“Yes, eBay,” Moomaw said.

Can The "Airbnb Of Kitchens" Give Local Food A Boost?

Aug 16, 2016
Luke Runyon / KUNC/Harvest Public Media

The hardest part of starting a new food business should be in perfecting the secret recipe. For many entrepreneurial cooks though, the tough times come when searching for a space to legally make and sell their food.

Commercial kitchen space, with stainless steel counters, industrial appliances meeting food safety regulations and appropriately-sized sinks, can be hard to come by and expensive to build. One tech startup is trying to fix that, using the same sharing economy concepts as travel titans Uber and Airbnb.

While several states now have laws -- often referred to as “cottage food” legislation --  that allow aspiring cooks to experiment in their home kitchens and sell their concoctions, many early stage food entrepreneurs say at a certain point they must graduate to a bigger space. To stay within the bounds of food safety rules, that move often puts them in the market for an inspected commercial kitchen.

Courtesy of Xcel Energy

Xcel Energy, Colorado’s largest power provider, wants to make $500 million to install smart meters and make other upgrades to its electricity system to improve reliability and give customers more information about their energy use.The utility filed information about its Advanced Grid Intelligence and Security proposal this week with the Colorado Public Utilities Commission.

It's a warm, sunny morning at the Homestead National Monument of America in southeastern Nebraska. A burn crew dressed in yellow and green flame-resistant clothing is about to set a patch of tall-grass prairie on fire — on purpose.

At least 22 percent of Pokémon Go's millions of users are minors, according to a Survey Monkey study obtained by Forbes. With that many kids and teens playing the game — which is rated for users 9 years old and up — they become potential targets for child sex offenders.

Publishing is a notoriously risky business.

A publishing house might give a first-time author a six-figure deal, only to see the book flop. It's always been hard to predict what will sell. Now publishers are getting some help from data that tells them how readers read — and that makes some people nervous.

A few years ago, Silicon Valley engineer Bindu Reddy was raising money for a new startup. An investor offered to contribute — not because of what she was trying to do, but because she was a woman.

That rubbed Reddy the wrong way, and she wrote about it — then the backlash began.

Marissa Mayer will go down in history as the last CEO of Yahoo. The great Internet pioneer is having its core business auctioned off to Verizon. When Mayer came on board four years ago, Yahoo was in a critical, make-or-break moment. It needed a decisive leader.

But in interviews with Mayer and people who worked with her, a different truth emerges: The CEO treated Yahoo more like a think tank than a sinking ship.

Adam Summers used to trade Snickers bars to get free CT scans of dead fish.

He likes fish. A lot.

Summers is a professor at the University of Washington in the biology department and School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences.

"I've always been a fish guy," he says. "It's just been in my blood since I was as small as I can remember." Summers was a scientific consultant on Finding Nemo and did similar work with Finding Dory.

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